Arms race

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  • Created by: Aabir
  • Created on: 29-05-15 10:49
Who developed the first atom bomb? When?
The US developed the first atom bomb in 1945.
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What was the situation at the Potsdam conference of 1945 (considering the arms race)?
The US had informed Britain of the development of the a-bomb, but kept the information from the USSR who found out through espionage. President Truman was arrogant because he knew that he didn't need Stalin's assistance in the war against Asia.
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Where and when was the first atom bomb dropped (in war)?
On the city of Hiroshima, Japan in August 1945. This ended the war in Asia.
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What was the name of the bomb and the plane that dropped the a-bomb on Hiroshima?
The bomb was named Little Boy and was dropped by the plane Enola Gay.
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How many people died in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki?
A total of 129,000 people died in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
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When and how did the USSR develop their first atom bomb?
In 1949 dropped the a-bomb RDS-1, developed through the help of espionage.
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Who developed the first hydrogen bomb? When?
The US developed the first hydrogen bomb in 1952.
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How much more powerful is the hydrogen bomb than the atom bomb?
The h-bomb is smaller but 2500 times more powerful than the a-bomb.
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When did the USSR develop the hydrogen bomb?
In 1953 the USSR h-bomb was developed.
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Who developed the first ICBMs? When?
The USSR developed their first ICBMs in 1957.
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What are ICBMs?
Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles are long range missiles designed to deliver nuclear missiles.
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What was the impact of ICBMs?
They were faster than flying planes to drop nuclear bombs and could be launched from anywhere.
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What was MAD?
In the early 60s the policy of Mutually Assured Destruction ensured that if one country launched a nuclear strike both countries would be completely destroyed, as by 1961 there were enough bombs to destroy the world.
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What were ABMs?
Anti-Ballistic Missiles shot down incoming missiles.
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Why was finding missiles on Cuba a major issue?
They undermined the US ABMs (which were in the north) and could reach most of America.
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What was SALT I?
In 1972 the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty agreed to put caps on the number of nuclear weapons the superpowers could have.
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What did Reagan increase defence spending to in 1981?
He raised it from $179 billion to $370 billion - the largest peace-time raise of defence spending in American history.
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What was SDI? Why was it controversial?
The Strategic Defence Initiative (aka Star Wars) was a plan to put lasers in space to detect and destroy incoming missiles. It created controversy because it broke the Outer-Space Treaty of 1967 and undermined the policy of MAD.
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What was the INF Treaty?
In 1987 the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty agreed to eliminate all nuclear forces with a range of 500-5500 km.
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What was CFE?
In 1990 the Conventional armed Forces in Europe Treaty agreed to limit conventional arms of NATO and the Warsaw Pact in Europe.
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What was START I?
In 1991 the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty agreed to destroy around a third of each country's nuclear warheads. It was signed in Moscow with pens made of scrap nuclear missile metal.
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Card 2

Front

What was the situation at the Potsdam conference of 1945 (considering the arms race)?

Back

The US had informed Britain of the development of the a-bomb, but kept the information from the USSR who found out through espionage. President Truman was arrogant because he knew that he didn't need Stalin's assistance in the war against Asia.

Card 3

Front

Where and when was the first atom bomb dropped (in war)?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What was the name of the bomb and the plane that dropped the a-bomb on Hiroshima?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How many people died in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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