Anglo-Norman Landholding

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  • Created by: Rose
  • Created on: 31-03-14 19:43
What did William have to ensure that the new landholding system would do?
1) still function with Normans instead of Englishmen. 2) still provide troops/taxes 3) cope with an Anglo-Norman absentee king, due to the cross-channel kingdom
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How did William's Tenurial Revolution take place?
1) when land came 'onto the market' 2) when land was confiscated by the King after rebellions or those at Stamford Bridge, Hastings etc. 3) if the king needed extra revenue. 4) whether the king needed to reward somebody or control land strategically
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William's Tenurial Revolution Changed...
1) The nature and composition of society e.g ranks and immigration 2) nature/role of kingship 3) economy 4) culture such as language, architecture
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Land Distribution 1066/70
William gave land to all of his top ranking followers as a reward for his followers in 1066. The land came from dead English: Robert of Mortain became Earl of Cornwall, Odo got land in Kent, William FitzOsbern got land in Hertfordshire/marshes
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How did William ensure he had enough land to redistribute?
demanded confiscation of land from enemies at Hastings - then granted it back to him for a fee. Claimed all land was ROYAL land so he became the most powerful landholder and everybody owed him their land.
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What was legal redistribution?
Royal grants such as writs gave land to individuals and then to those lower down the chain, such as land granted to abbeys and then given to individual knights.
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What is semi-legal redistribution?
A landholding widow forced to marry a knight. A child heir taken as ward of earl/king. This wasn't fairly gained.
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What is legal redistribution?
Normans took land regardless of true ownership.
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What were the consequences of the tenurial revolution/land redistribution?
50% land owned by 90 tenants in chief/nobles. 25% land owned by 11 'super barons'. By 1087 William had doubled royal land and few landholders were English. Land was held in parcels rather than big block (Odo had land in 20 shires until 1082)
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Impact of Tenurial Revolution on Society...
Pre-1066 land was held in commendation (personal loyalty to a lord, such as a knight) or sake and soke (land in return for service/rent). Some land was allodial (no landlord, owned outright). Land was held by different methods - IT WAS NOT FEUDALISM
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What is the definition of feudalism?
A personal relationship between between lord and vassal, characterised by landholding, loyalty + service (MILITARY). System of providing fighting men for the king - provide service.
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What does Enfeoffed mean?
Swearing an oath/pledge to serve the king or barons in return of land.
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What does Sub-Enfeoffed mean?
Where a knight swears to fight for a baron in exchange for a grant of the baron's land. Peasants don't swear any oaths but can love on the knight's land if they fight for the knight. This is called FEUDAL MILITARY SERVICE.
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What is bookland?
Land which is owned/held in a contract by three generations. When the grandson dies the land goes back to the king. This was the norm pre-1066
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

1) when land came 'onto the market' 2) when land was confiscated by the King after rebellions or those at Stamford Bridge, Hastings etc. 3) if the king needed extra revenue. 4) whether the king needed to reward somebody or control land strategically

Back

How did William's Tenurial Revolution take place?

Card 3

Front

1) The nature and composition of society e.g ranks and immigration 2) nature/role of kingship 3) economy 4) culture such as language, architecture

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

William gave land to all of his top ranking followers as a reward for his followers in 1066. The land came from dead English: Robert of Mortain became Earl of Cornwall, Odo got land in Kent, William FitzOsbern got land in Hertfordshire/marshes

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

demanded confiscation of land from enemies at Hastings - then granted it back to him for a fee. Claimed all land was ROYAL land so he became the most powerful landholder and everybody owed him their land.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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