Anglo-Saxon Culture (Unit 1.)

  • Created by: cieran_10
  • Created on: 29-04-18 10:29
In what year did a Somerset ploughman discover a gold jewel in his field?
In 1693.
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What is the name of the jewel found by a ploughman in the 17th century
The Alfred Jewel.
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What is the image of on the ------ Jewel?
A man carrying two long-stemmed plants.
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What are the Old English words engraved onto the side of the ------ Jewel and what does this mean?
ALFRED MEC HEHT GEWYRCAN. Meaning: Alfred had me worked/made.
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Where is the ------ Jewel stored now and since it was found?
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.
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What do experts believe the ------ Jewel would have been used for in the Anglo-Saxon period?
That it would have been attached to a wooden stick and used to point to words and images in old manuscripts.
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Where is it believed that the ------ Jewel belonged to?
A monastery.
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In what year did Alfred send out pointers to monasteries in England?
AD980.
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What did King Alfred of Wessex do to for the Anglo-Saxon people and when did he do this?
He started the English fightback against the Vikings at the end of the ninth century.
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What is the ------ Jewel a sign of?
Great skill from the Anglo-Saxon people.
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What did the greatest art (of the period) involve?
Engraving.
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What was the Fuller Brooch named after?
The person that owned it.
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When was the Fuller Brooch made?
At the end of the ninth century.
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What does the Fuller Brooch represent?
The five senses.
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How is sight shown on the Fuller Brooch and where is it shown?
It is shown at the centre, by a man staring out with wide eyes.
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What is the Fuller Brooch made of?
Silver.
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How is taste shown on the Fuller Brooch and where is it shown?
It is shown above and to the left, by a man with his hand in his mouth.
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How is smell shown on the Fuller Brooch and where is it shown?
It is shown above and to the right, by a man with his hands behind his back and he is surrounded by tall plants.
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How is touch shown on the Fuller Brooch and where is it shown?
It is shown below and to right, by a man rubbing his hands together.
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How is hearing shown on the Fuller Brooch and where is it shown?
It is shown below and to the right, by a man with his hands behind his ear.
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What two people stole precious metalwork, gold books and jewels from Anglo-Saxon England?
The Vikings and then the Normans.
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Who destroyed Anglo-Saxon religious art and why?
Henry VIII, when he dissolved the monasteries.
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Up until what year was England known for its engraving and metalwork?
Until the 1050's.
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Who did an English chronicler praise in the 1050's for their metalwork?
They praised the Abbot at Evesham.
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What did a Norman chronicler say about English craftsmen?
That people travel from other countries to England for English art.
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How did the Norman chronicler describe English men?
As: "outstandingly skilful in all the arts."
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How did the Norman chronicler describe English women?
As "highly skilled at weaving with gold thread and at embroidery."
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Where is there an example of good English embroidery from Anglo-Saxon women?
In the women's embroidery on the Bayeux Tapestry.
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Who ordered the creation of the Bayeux Tapestry, in terms of the women?
Their Norman masters.
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How long is the Anglo-Saxon case from the late 11th century?
23cm.
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What is this case made from?
Walrus ivory.
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What four things were the top and sides of the case decorated with?
Dragons, lions, birds of prey and human hunters.
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What was the base of case decorated with?
Images of archery and farming.
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What two things could the case have held?
Quill pens or musical instruments.
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Around what year were the Marvels of the East written?
1000.
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What three things does the semi-scientific document contain, which was written in the 11th century?
The Marvels of the East, a map of the world and astronomical information.
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Name two creatures that were believed to live in the East.
Half man and half lion creatures and human-eating giants.
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Who created the Marvels of the East?
The ancient Greeks.
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Who sustained the Marvels of the East?
The Romans.
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In what language did the Anglo-Saxons record the Marvels of the East?
Old English.
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What is the most famous Anglo-Saxon work?
Beowulf.
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How long is Beowulf?
Three thousand lines long.
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What type of literature is Beowulf?
A poem.
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Between what years was Beowulf recorded?
Between AD700 and 1000.
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Where is Beowulf set and what was this?
In Scandinavia, which was the home of the Vikings.
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Give a quick and small summary of the story of Beowulf.
It is a story of a warrior that hunts down a monster and then slays its mother.
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Is it impossible that Beowulf was written during the Anglo-Saxon times?
No, it is not.
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How was the literature performed during the Anglo-Saxon period?
It was spoken out loud for an audience.
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Name two forms of Beowulf?
Original/Old English and modern/English.
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When did King Alfred order the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles to be written?
At the end of the ninth century.
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What were the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles?
A history of Britain that started from the arrival of Julius Caesar in Britain.
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What happened to the different copies of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles?
They were sent to different monasteries.
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How did the different monks (from different monasteries) update the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles?
Independently.
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Until when were the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles updated?
Until the 12th century.
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Identify two reasons as to why the Anglo-Saxon chronicles are unreliable.
They are bias and have some gaps.
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What do the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles say about the Anglo-Saxons?
That they had a growing identity.
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Name five types of Anglo-Saxon literature.
Sermons, poems, saint biographies, medical treatments and advice on grammar.
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What is the largest known collection of Anglo-Saxon literature?
The Exeter Book.
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From what century are the works in the Exeter Book?
From the late tenth century.
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Who owns the Exeter Book?
Exeter Cathedral.
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What else (besides from religious documents) are in the Exeter Book?
Rude riddles.
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Name the three main materials used to build during the Anglo-Saxon period?
Wood, clay and straw.
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What is the Old English word for builder?
Timbrend.
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Why have all Anglo-Saxon buildings rotted away?
As they were all made from wood.
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Name the two things involved in discovering the size and location of Anglo-Saxon housing?
Post-holes and soil.
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What are post-holes?
Where the upright timbers stood.
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How can soil be used (a long with post-holes) to find out more about Anglo-Saxon building? (3.)
The location of the post-holes can be found by the different soil colours created where the post-holes have rotted away.
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What did MOST Anglo-Saxons live in? (3.)
Rectangular and single-storey houses with thatched roofs.
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What is the difference between the houses of thegn and ceorls?
Their houses were larger and were two-storeys.
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How can historians grip what a building looked like in the Anglo-Saxon period?
By a description of the building before it was burned down.
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Why was fire a constant threat to Anglo-Saxon housing? (2.)
Due to the timber walls and thatched roofs.
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What did an 11th century writer praise, in terms of building and embroidery?
A nunnery in Wilton.
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What did an 11th century writer compare a nunnery to?
The Temple of Solomon.
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Where is the Temple of Solomon described?
In the Bible.
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Name five features of the Temple of Solomon-esque nunnery.
A winding staircase, painted plasterwork, wooden carvings, precious stones and golden ornaments.
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How did an 11th century writer describe the nun's outfits? (2.)
That they were beautifully embroidered and weaved.
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By what year were there only three castles in England?
By 1065.
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Where were the designs for the three English castles from and why were they from there?
From Normandy, due to them being designed/built by the Norman friends of Edward.
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What were few burh walls made from, due to the Romans?
Stone.
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Name a burh that had a stone wall?
London.
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What was the Anglo-Saxon name for London?
Londonburh.
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What was the capital of England during the Anglo-Saxon period?
Winchester.
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What was the largest burh in England at the time?
London.
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What were MOST burhs defended by? (4.)
Large earthworks, for example: ditches and ramparts that had strong wooden barriers.
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Had the stone cross worship idea died out?
Not entirely.
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What did most Anglo-Saxon communities have to replace a large stone cross and what did this develop into?
They had timber shelter, which developed into stone shelters.
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Where still has part of an original Anglo-Saxon church?
Barton-upon-Humber.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is the name of the jewel found by a ploughman in the 17th century

Back

The Alfred Jewel.

Card 3

Front

What is the image of on the ------ Jewel?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the Old English words engraved onto the side of the ------ Jewel and what does this mean?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Where is the ------ Jewel stored now and since it was found?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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