AGGRESSION - Social Psychological Explanation

Who put forward the frustration aggression hypothesis?
Dollard
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What is stage 1 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?
Drive to goal - A person is motivated to achieve a goal
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What is stage 2 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?
Obstacle to goal - An external factor blocks the person's ability to achieve their goal
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What is stage 3 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?
Frustration - Frustration is experienced because of the blocked goal. the cause of frustration may be immediate (eg. loosing phone) or abstract (eg. being angry at the government)
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What is stage 4 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?
Aggressive Drive - The hypothesis is based on the Psychodynamic approach and view aggression as a psychological drive
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What is stage 5 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?
Aggressive Behaviour (displaced aggression) - Aggressive behaviour is produced. If this isn't appropriate the behaviour is inhibited. The behaviour is displaced onto someone or something else
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What is stage 6 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?
Catharsis - The aggressive drive is satisfied, reducing the drive and making further aggression less likely
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How many concepts of social learning theory are there?
6
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What is the first concept?
Modelling - In order for social learning to take place, someone must carry out the behaviour to be learnt, they are referred to as models. Which can be symbolic or live.
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What is the second concept?
Identification - If an individual identifies with the model they're more likely to imitate because they think they'll have the same outcome
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What is the third concept?
Vicarious Reinforcement - Behaviour is reinforced as the model is rewarded
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What is the fourth concept?
Imitation - behaviour of model is observed and reproduced by the individual
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What is the fifth concept?
Mediational Processes - Cognitive processes for learning to take place (attention, retention, reproduction, motivation)
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What is the sixth concept?
Self-Efficacy - The extent to which we believe our actions will achieve a required goal
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What is de-individuation? and who put foward the concept?
De-individuation is a concept used by LeBon to explain the behaviour of individuals in crowds
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What happens when you are an individual? (6)
Responsibility, Rational normative behaviour, Easily identified, Self-identity, Guilt, Constrained by social norms
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What happens when you are in a crowd? (6)
Shared responsibility, Loss of responsibility, Anonymity, Loss of self identity, Less guilt, Not restrained by social norms
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What are the two types of states called?
Individuated & De-individuated
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How does De-individuation affect aggression?
When you're De-individuated you ignore social norms which leads to aggression
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What conditions make De-individuation more likely?
Anonymity, Intoxication, Social media, Darkness, Hidden identity
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What are the consequences of anonymity?
Private self-awareness (less self-critical) & Public self-awareness is reduced (one individual among many)
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Card 2

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What is stage 1 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?

Back

Drive to goal - A person is motivated to achieve a goal

Card 3

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What is stage 2 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?

Back

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Card 4

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What is stage 3 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?

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Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

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What is stage 4 of the frustration-aggression hypothesis?

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