Aeneid book 6- the shade of Palinurus

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  • Created by: Lydia22
  • Created on: 07-06-17 02:21
Ecce gubernator sese Palinurus agebat, qui Libyco nuper cursu, dum sidera servat, exciderat puppi mediis effusus in undis.
Behold, there came the helmsman, Palinurus, who fell from the stern on the Libyan passage, flung into the midst of the waves, as he watched the stars.
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hunc ubi vix multa maestum cognovit in umbra, sic prior adloquitur:
When Aeneas had recognised him with difficulty sorrowing among the deep shadows, he spoke first, saying:
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'quis te, Palinure, deorum eripuit nobis medioque sub aequore mersit? dic age. namque mihi, fallax haud ante repertus hoc uno responso animum delusit Apollo, qui fore te ponto incolumem finisque canebat venturum Ausonios. en haec promissa fides est?
‘What god tore you from us, Palinurus, and drowned you mid-ocean? For in this one prophecy Apollo has misled me, he whom I never found false before, he said that you would be safe at sea and reach Ausonia’s shores. Is this the truth of his promise?’
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ille autem: 'neque te Phoebi cortina fefellit, dux Anchisiade, nec me deus aequore mersit.
But he replied: ‘Phoebus’s tripod did not fail you, Aeneas, my captain, nor did a god drown me in the deep.
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namque gubernaclum multa vi forte revulsum, cui datus haerebam custos cursusque regebam, praecipitans traxi mecum.
By chance the helm was torn from me with violence as I clung there, on duty as ordered, steering our course, and I dragged it headlong with me.
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maria aspera iuro non ullum pro me tantum cepisse timorem, quam tua ne spoliata armis, excussa magistro, deficeret tantis navis surgentibus undis.
I swear by the cruel sea that I feared less for myself than for your ship, lest robbed of its gear, and cleared of its helmsman, it might founder among such surging waves.
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tris Notus hibernas immensa per aequora noctes vexit me violentus aqua; vix lumine quarto prospexi Italiam summa sublimis ab unda.
The Southerly drove me violently through the vast seas for three stormy nights: high on the crest of a wave, in the fourth dawn, I could just make out Italy.
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paulatim adnabam terrae; iam tuta tenebam, ni gens crudelis madida cum veste gravatum prensantemque uncis manibus capita aspera montis ferro invasisset praedamque ignara putasset.
Gradually I swam to shore: grasped now at safety, but as I caught at the sharp tips of the rocks, weighed down by my water-soaked clothes, the savage people attacked me with knives, ignorantly thinking me a prize.
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nunc me fluctus habet versantque in litore venti. quod te per caeli iucundum lumen et auras, per genitorem oro, per spes surgentis Iuli, eripe me his, invicte, malis: aut tu mihi terram inice, namque potes, portusque require Velinos;
Now the waves have me, and the winds roll me along the shore. Unconquered one, I beg you, by the sweet light and air of heaven, by your father, and your hopes in Iulus to come, save me from this evil: either find Velia’s harbour again
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aut tu, si qua via est, si quam tibi diva creatrix ostendit (neque enim, credo, sine numine divum flumina tanta paras Stygiamque innare paludem), da dextram misero et tecum me tolle per undas, sedibus ut saltem placidis in morte quiescam
(for you can) and sprinkle earth on me, or if there is some way, if your divine mother shows you one (since you’d not attempt to sail such waters, and the Stygian marsh, without a god’s will, I think) then give this wretch your hand and take me with
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talia fatus erat coepit cum talia vates: 'unde haec, o Palinure, tibi tam dira cupido? tu Stygias inhumatus aquas amnemque severum Eumenidum aspicies, ripamve iniussus adibis?
So he spoke, and the priestess began to reply like this: ‘Where does this dire longing of yours come from, O Palinurus? Can you see the Stygian waters, unburied, or the grim river of the Furies, Cocytus, or come unasked to the shore?
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desine fata deum flecti sperare precando, sed cape dicta memor, duri solacia casus.
Cease to hope that divine fate can be tempered by prayer, But hold my words in your memory, as a comfort in your hardship:
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nam tua finitimi, longe lateque per urbes prodigiis acti caelestibus, ossa piabunt et statuent tumulum et tumulo sollemnia mittent, aeternumque locus Palinuri nomen habebit.'
the nearby peoples, from cities far and wide, will be moved by divine omens to worship your bones, and build a tomb, and send offerings to the tomb, and the place will have Palinurus as its everlasting name.’
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his dictis curae emotae pulsusque parumper corde dolor tristi; gaudet cognomine terra.
His anxiety was quelled by her words, and, for a little while, grief was banished from his sad heart: he delighted in the land being so named.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

When Aeneas had recognised him with difficulty sorrowing among the deep shadows, he spoke first, saying:

Back

hunc ubi vix multa maestum cognovit in umbra, sic prior adloquitur:

Card 3

Front

‘What god tore you from us, Palinurus, and drowned you mid-ocean? For in this one prophecy Apollo has misled me, he whom I never found false before, he said that you would be safe at sea and reach Ausonia’s shores. Is this the truth of his promise?’

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

But he replied: ‘Phoebus’s tripod did not fail you, Aeneas, my captain, nor did a god drown me in the deep.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

By chance the helm was torn from me with violence as I clung there, on duty as ordered, steering our course, and I dragged it headlong with me.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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