A Room With A View

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George: "We know that we come from the winds, and that we shall return to them; that all life is perhaps a knot, a tangle, a blemish in the eternal smoothness. By why should this make us unhappy? Let us rather love one another."
George holds an unconventional and irreligious view that poses a challenge to the stuffy Protestant ethic of the society Forster describes. He thinks that love between human beings matters more than anything else.
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Cecil: "The Honeychurches were a worthy family, but he began to realise that Lucy was of another clay; and perhaps...he ought to introduce her into more congenial circles as soon as possible."
Cecil wants to remove Lucy from the 'worthy' but unsatisfactory class the Honeychurches inhabit - that of the well-to-do bourgeois - and absorb her into the slightly MORE well-to-do, cosmopolitan social circle that his family belongs to.
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Narrator: "Cecil must be at once described. He was medieval, like a Gothic statue."
Cecil is the captain of the "medieval" team in the novel, representing the stuffy old order of British high society, and his appearance makes his allegiance obvious. This comparison directly lines up with the images we have of George as a Greek god.
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Narrator: "The elder ladies exchanged glances, not of disapproval; it is suitable that a girl should feel deeply.
Miss Lavish and Charlotte acknowlegde that young people can have their deep and special feelings (as we all do). The implication seems to be, though, that once a woman is out of her girlhood, she shouldn't feel so deeply.
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Mr Emerson: "I used to think I could teach young people the whole of life, but I know better now, and all my teaching of George has come down to this: beware of muddle.”
Lucy is deeply 'muddled' about her feelings for George, and the way Mr Emerson puts it in such quaint and even childlike terms makes it easy for everyone to understand, if perhaps trivialising it.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Cecil: "The Honeychurches were a worthy family, but he began to realise that Lucy was of another clay; and perhaps...he ought to introduce her into more congenial circles as soon as possible."

Back

Cecil wants to remove Lucy from the 'worthy' but unsatisfactory class the Honeychurches inhabit - that of the well-to-do bourgeois - and absorb her into the slightly MORE well-to-do, cosmopolitan social circle that his family belongs to.

Card 3

Front

Narrator: "Cecil must be at once described. He was medieval, like a Gothic statue."

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Narrator: "The elder ladies exchanged glances, not of disapproval; it is suitable that a girl should feel deeply.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Mr Emerson: "I used to think I could teach young people the whole of life, but I know better now, and all my teaching of George has come down to this: beware of muddle.”

Back

Preview of the front of card 5

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