A-level PE definitions

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Chemical energy
Energy stored within the bonds of chemical compounds (within molecules)
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ATP
Chemical energy stored as a high energy compound in the body. It is the only immediately usable source of energy in the human body
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Potential energy
'Stored' energy which is ready to be used when required
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Kinetic energy
Energy in the form of muscle contraction/joint movement
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Force
A pull or push that alters, or tends to alter, the state of motion of a body. It is measured in Newtons (N)
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ATPase
The enzyme that helps break down ATP to releas energy
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Exothermic
A chemical reaction that releases energy as it progresses
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Endothermic
A chemical reaction that requires energy to be added for it to progress
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Coupled Reaction
When the products from one reaction, such as energy, are then used in another reaction
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Work
Work is done when a force is applied to a body to move it over a certain distance. Measured in joules (J)
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Energy
Energy is the ability to perform work or put mass into motion. Measured in Joules. 1 calorie = 4.18 Joules
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Power
Power is the rate at which work can be done eg work divided by time. Measured in watts (W)
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Anaerobic
The body working in the absence of oxygen
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Glycolysis
The splitting of a glucose molecule
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Anaerobic Glycolysis
The partial incomplete breakdown of glucose intp pyruvic acid in the absence of oxygen
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Aerobic Glycolysis
The partial incomplete breakdown of glucose into pyruvic acid in the presence of oxygen
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Lactic Acid
Anaerobic glycolysis produces lactic acid but it is quicklu converted into a substrate salt called lactate which is easier to disperse via the blood stream. Although different compounds, the term 'lactate' and 'lactic acid' are used interchangeably
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Threshold
The point when one energy system stops being the predominant energy provider for the resynthesis of ATP
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Energy continuum
The energy continuum shows how the energy systems interacts to provide energy for the resynthesus of ATP
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EPOC
Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption. The amount of excess oxygen consumption above that at a resting level, during recovery, to restore the body to it's pre-exercise state
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Alactacid
The 'a' before lactacid signifies it is without lactic acid
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VO2 max
Maximum oxygen consumption attainable during maximal work
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Myoglobin
Red pigment in muscles that store oxygen before passing it on to mitochondria for aerobic respiration
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Carbonic Acid
Carbon Dioxide combined with water
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Carbaminohaemoglobin
Carbon dioxide combined with haemoglobin
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Interval training
A form of training incorporating periods of work intersperse with periods of recovery
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VO2
Volume of oxygen consumed
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Recovery
Recovery is the process that restores the body to its pre-exercise state
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Oxygen debt
A temporary oxygen shortage in the body tissues arising from exercise
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Oxygen deficit
The difference between oxygen uptake of the body during early stage of exercise and during a similar duration in a steady state of exercise, sometimes considered as the formation of oxygen debt
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Aerobic capacity
Highest amount of oxygen consumed during maximal exercise
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Card 2

Front

Chemical energy stored as a high energy compound in the body. It is the only immediately usable source of energy in the human body

Back

ATP

Card 3

Front

'Stored' energy which is ready to be used when required

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Energy in the form of muscle contraction/joint movement

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

A pull or push that alters, or tends to alter, the state of motion of a body. It is measured in Newtons (N)

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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