25.06.18

When you suspect a horse has navicular how do you assess?
Walk up view from back, front and side to assess lameness and how the horse lands. Use heel testers starting at the front of the foot and working back to heels.
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What is the treatment protocol for Navicular?
Balance the hoof. Make comfortable and encourage heel first landing using boots/pads 20 mins every other day. Eliminate infection. Work to strengthen weak structures over time. Adjust diet and environment etc.
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A flat foot is basically a collapsed internal arch. How would you treat this?
Check for misdiagnosis (LGL). Eliminate gastric problems. Sole is likely thin. If toe is long back up instead of lowering toe to sole. Boot/pad for exercise and hard surfaces, field also if baked dry
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In the case of flat/underrun feet, why might you need to lower the sole plane below normal level?
If the heel purchase is too far forward (usually is), this will bring the weight bearing surface back
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In the case of a negative P3 angle as with a collapsed internal arch, what kind of sole support would you normally use?
A wedged pad (thicker at the heel) to correct the P3 angle
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Why do we use pads with navicular horses?
Distribute weight. Apply pressure where needed, reduce concussion, encourage heel first landing
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How would you rehabilitate a contracted foot?
Hoofstuff in DCS. Often have thick sole in palmar portion. Apply frog pressure (not too much), Use hard surfaces in boots/pads. Lowering heels often means trimming through love sole. MAy lose landmarks for medio-lateral balance. Tendon check
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Soft surfaces will protect the hooves from concussion but hard surfaces will what?
build structure / stimulate
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Horses with heel pain are worse ______
Downhill
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Which gait is the best for rehab?
Walk`
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Are pulses a diagnostic of Navicular?
No - they may or may not be present
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If the digital cushion feels hot....?
Rest the horse
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What is False Bar?
An overgrowth of sole around the apex of frog.
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What is the most common cause of false bar?
Instability in the back of the foot causing excess movement of the frog stay
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In the case of laminits a crushed paracuneal artery may leak. How does this manifect in the sole?
False bar around the apex of frog
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What is Nail *****?
Where a shoe nail contacts the sensitive laminae (as opposed to nail bind where it just comes close enough to cause discomfort)
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What is Radio-opaque
Cannot be penetrated by xray. Opaque shows up like opal
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How would youj go about treating thrush?
Find the cause. Trim away necrotic tissue, Topically treat with Sudocreme hoof stuff etc. Prevent reinfection with regular hoof picking
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What are the most common causes of thrush?
Poor nutrition, Hoof balance, Inadequate pressure, Inflamed tissue, Poor hoof hygiene, Metabolic disorders
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What are Sheared Heels?
Instability between the medial and lateral heels caused by: *Severe DCS *Musculo-skeletal imbalance *Poor hoof balance
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How would you treat sheared heels?
Treat any infection. Balance the hoof. Stabilise the hoof capsule. Stimulate better structure
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What is Canker?
A chronic, moist pus forming inflammatory enlargement of the horn producing tissues of the foot. It is most common in tropical climates and very rare.
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What are the characteristics of Canker?
Starts in the frog. Foul Odor. White Exudate. Proliferative tissue. Cottage cheese texture. Can spread into collateral grooves and sole. Fusobacterum Necrophorum usually present.
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How is canker usually treated?
Remove all affected tissue and that surrounding it. Apply strong antiseptic dressing. Keep hoof covered for up to 6 weeks. Shoe for support
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What is Mud Fever?
A scab-inducing form of dermatitis which affects the heels, pastern & fetlock. Also known as greasy heel, pasternal dermatitis and bog rash.
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What is Dermatophilus Congolensis
Mud Fever
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What are the symptoms of Mud Fever?
*Collection of scabs. *inflamed skin *Swelling often present *Painful Lesions *Often deep fissures in the skin
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Mud fever can often be an indication of low dietary _______
Copper
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Can mud fever cause raised digital pulses?
Yes
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How would you treat Mud Fever?
Soften and remove scabs (vaseline overnight). Treat with sudocreme/udder cream/cleantrax if severe. Cover to keep clean and dry. Ensure adequate diaetary copper
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What is a Simple Fracture?
Skin remains intact
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What is a compound fracture?
Fracture breaks the skin
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What is a comminuted fracture?
Multiple pieces
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What is a compression fracture?
Collapses under pressure
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What is a complete fracture?
Bone fragments separate completely
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What is an incomplete fracture?
Bone still partially intact
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What are bone cysts?
Solitary, circular or semicircular lucent areas in a bone, usually subchondral (beneath the cartilage of a joint)
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What sort of symptoms would you find with a bone infection?
Usually acute lameness. Repeated abcessing in the same area. Heat/swelling. Usually caused by penetrating wound
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How is Luxation treated?
Internal Fixation (needs to be performed early), Re-set joint under anaesthetic. Apply plaster cast. Box rest 6-8 weeks
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What are hyperkeratinised Horn Nodules?
Sometimes LGL present. Causes a deviation at the white line. Often accompanies seedy toe. Densely keratinised horn. Nearly always in the centre of the toe
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What are keratomas?
Neopastic and non-neoplastic space-occupying lesions in the hoof. Most commonly found in the toe
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What does the word "Neoplastic" pertain to?
Tumours
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What is White Line Disease?
Invasion of the inner wall by a bacteria, yeast or fungus which results in varying degrees of damage to the structural integrity of the hoof
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What causes WLD?
Dietary Imbalance. Laminitis. Trauma
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What kind of vitamin is Biotin and where is it produced in the body?
B vitamin produced in the hind gut
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How would you treat WLD?
Address the diet. Disinfect (milton soak weekly 10 mins). Use cleantrax for serious infections
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What is seedy toe?
A localised pocket of infected horn in the toe wall
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What causes seedy toe?
Stone in hoof wall. Pre-existing crack becomes infected. Fault in the wall caused by keratoma or HKH
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How would you treat a seedy toe?
Clean out the hole. Treat the infection. Pack with hoof stuff to keep dirt out. Measure depth to monitor changes
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Why might you see a horizontal fold around the whole hoof wall?
Sinker
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What is the most common cause of vertical cracks which follow the line of tubules in the hoof?
Incorrect mechanical forces applied either through trauma or poor hoof balance
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How would you treat quarter cracks?
Scoop quarters, score out the crack, apply field paste or effol winter hoof balm
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is the treatment protocol for Navicular?

Back

Balance the hoof. Make comfortable and encourage heel first landing using boots/pads 20 mins every other day. Eliminate infection. Work to strengthen weak structures over time. Adjust diet and environment etc.

Card 3

Front

A flat foot is basically a collapsed internal arch. How would you treat this?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

In the case of flat/underrun feet, why might you need to lower the sole plane below normal level?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

In the case of a negative P3 angle as with a collapsed internal arch, what kind of sole support would you normally use?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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