The Lake District case study

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The Lake District National Park is Englands National Park and includes Scafell pike its highest mountain, Wastwater - its deepest lake and thriving communities like Keswick and Bowness-on-Windermere.  There are 42,400 permanent residents and a huge amount of activities for visitors on offer, including walking, climbing, cycling, boat cruises and various museums. Current surveys show that at least 15.8 million visitors come to the Lake District each year spending a total of £925 million! Most come to enjoy the scenery, peace and quiet and walking but many others visit specific attractions or take part in an outdoor activity.

They stay in a mixture of self-catering and serviced accommodation. The National Park Authority's current challenge is finding ways of encouraging sustainable tourism without further damaging the very landscape which visitors come to enjoy. Indeed public access to the uplands or fells is unrestricted, and this can pose problems.

Problems in the Lake district and its attempt and managment

The limits placed upon development in the Lake District means that new houses are seldom built.  There has also been a rise in the number of people from outside of the Lake District buying up property for a second home they can use to holiday in.  These 2

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