SS, Chapter 2- Part 2

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  • Created by: Jie Min
  • Created on: 10-06-12 07:07

Part 2: Measures to control the flow of traffic.

·        Area Licensing Scheme (ALS)

Under the Area Licensing Scheme (ALS), motorists had to pay for the use of certain roads in Singapore. These roads were bounded within areas designated as Restricted Zones.  Gantries were set up at the boundaries of city areas to monitor motorists who drove in to ‘Restricted Zones’. To support the ALS, other measures such as improving bus services were implemented. When the ALS first started in June 1975, motorists were unhappy about the increased costs of travelling. However, overtime, many people showed support as the ALS was successful, by ensuring smooth traffic in the Central Business District (CBD). The volume of traffic going into the CBD during 7.30-9.30am, reduced by 24800 vehicles. (Linking sentence) With the implementation of the ALS, many people chose to take public transport or avoid driving into ‘Restricted Zones’. As a result, this measure ensured smooth traffic flow by reducing the number of cars in the CBD.

·      Electronic Road Pricing (ERP)

Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) is an electronic system of road pricing based on the ‘pay as you use’ principle.  It served as the same purpose as the Area Licensing Scheme (ALS), where motorists had to pay for the use of certain roads in Singapore. However unlike the labour-intensive ALS, ERP is more efficient as it uses up to date technology to monitor and regulate traffic flow. Thus, ALS was replaced in 1998. In the ERP system, payment would be deducted electronically from the cash card inserted in the In-Vehicle-Unit (installed in each vehicle), as it passes the gantry. (Linking sentence) With the implementation of the ERP, many people chose to take public transport or avoid driving into ‘Restricted Zones’. As a result, this measure ensured smooth traffic flow by reducing the number of cars in the CBD.

·      Park-and-Ride Scheme

The Park-and-Ride…

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