Secular Buddhism and Dual-Belonging

Paul Knitter 

  • Professor of Theology in New York. 
  • Originally a Roman Catholic priest. 
  • Became known for his religious pluralism after he published his book ''No Other Name'' in 1985. 
  • We can also learn a lot from his beliefs with his book ''Without Buddha - I would not be a Christian''. 
  • Some people find his views unsettling, but others welcome his ideas such as an 8th Christian sacrament. 
  • Sacrament of Silence - focusing on mindful breathing and serenity - a distinctly Theravada view. 
  • He finds Buddhist meditation very helpful in everyday life and believes that Christians should take it up as a part of their practice. 
  • He has searched for and developed a non-dualistic understanding of God and the world, and it is through his Buddhists beliefs that he has reconnected with Aquinas in this way. 
  • He believes in phrases like ''inter-being'' (Thich Naht Hanh). 
  • He also believes in Buddhist teachings such as interdependency and shunyata. 
  • He is working in a theological minefield. 
  • One of his problems is that religion points at a mystery that can never be captured in human language. 
  • He has been accused of a kind of…

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Secular Buddhism and Dual-Belonging

Paul Knitter 

  • Professor of Theology in New York. 
  • Originally a Roman Catholic priest. 
  • Became known for his religious pluralism after he published his book ''No Other Name'' in 1985. 
  • We can also learn a lot from his beliefs with his book ''Without Buddha - I would not be a Christian''. 
  • Some people find his views unsettling, but others welcome his ideas such as an 8th Christian sacrament. 
  • Sacrament of Silence - focusing on mindful breathing and serenity - a distinctly Theravada view. 
  • He finds Buddhist meditation very helpful in everyday life and believes that Christians should take it up as a part of their practice. 
  • He has searched for and developed a non-dualistic understanding of God and the world, and it is through his Buddhists beliefs that he has reconnected with Aquinas in this way. 
  • He believes in phrases like ''inter-being'' (Thich Naht Hanh). 
  • He also believes in Buddhist teachings such as interdependency and shunyata. 
  • He is working in a theological minefield. 
  • One of his problems is that religion points at a mystery that can never be captured in human language. 
  • He has been accused of a kind of…

Comments

No comments have yet been made