Respiration

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Cell respiration

3.7.1 Define cell respiration.

Cell respiration is the controlled release of energy from organic compounds in cells to form ATP.

3.7.2 State that, in cell respiration, glucose in the cytoplasm is broken down by glycolysis into pyruvate, with a small yield of ATP.

In cell respiration, glucose in the cytoplasm is broken down by glycolysis into pyruvate with a small yield of ATP.

3.7.3 Explain that, during anaerobic cell respiration, pyruvate can be converted in the cytoplasm into lactate, or ethanol and carbon dioxide, with no further yield of ATP.

In anaerobic cell respiration the pyruvate stays in the cytoplasm and in humans is converted into lactate which is the removed from the cell. In yeast the pyruvate is converted into carbon dioxide and ethanol. In either case, no ATP is produced.

3.7.4 Explain that, during aerobic cell respiration, pyruvate can be broken down in the mitochondrion into carbon dioxide and water with a large yield of ATP.

If oxygen is available, the pyruvate is taken up into the mitochondria and is broken down into carbon dioxide and water. A large amount of ATP is released during this process.

Cell respiration

8.1.1 State that oxidation involves the loss of electrons from an element, whereas reduction involves a gain of electrons; and that oxidation frequently involves gaining oxygen or losing hydrogen, whereas reduction frequently involves losing oxygen or gaining hydrogen.

Oxidation involves the loss of electrons from an element, whereas reduction involves the gain of electrons and that oxidation frequently involves gaining oxygen or losing hydrogen, whereas reduction frequently involves losing oxygen or gaining hydrogen.

8.1.2 Outline the process of glycolysis, including phosphorylation, lysis, oxidation and ATP formation.

Step 1 - Glucose is phosphorylated. Two phosphate groups are added to glucose to form hexose biphosphate. These two phosphate groups are provided by two molecules of ATP.

Step 2 - Lysis of hexose biphosphate. Hexose biphosphate splits into two molecules of triose phosphate.

Step 3 - Each triose phosphate molecules is oxidised. Two atoms of hydrogen are removed from each molecule. The energy released by the oxidation is used to add another phosphate group to each molecule. This will result in two 3-carbon compounds, each carrying two phosphate groups. NAD+ is the hydrogen carrier that accepts the hydrogen atoms lost from each triose phosphate molecule.

Step 4 - Two pyruvate molecules are formed by removing two phosphate groups from each molecule. These phosphate groups are given to ADP molecules and form ATP.

Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm of cells. Two ATP molecules are used and 4 ATP molecules are produced. Therefore there is a net yield of two ATP molecules. Also, two NAD+ are converted into NADH + H+ during glycolysis.(http://ibguides.com/images/biology_figure_8.1.1_glycolysis.png)

Figure 8.1.1 - Steps in glycolysis

8.1.3 Draw and label a diagram showing the structure of a mitochondrion as seen in electron micrographs.

(http://ibguides.com/images/biology_figure_8.1.2_mitochondrion.png)

8.1.4 Explain aerobic respiration, including the link reaction, the Krebs cycle, the role of NADH + H+, the electron transport

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