Obedience: Milgram's research

  • Obedience: Milgram's research:
  • AO1:
  • Key study: MIlgram's origional obedience study:
  • Procedure - Milgram recruited 40 male participants through newspaper ads and postal flyers. The ad said he was looking for participants for a memory study. Participants were aged between 20 and 50, in jobs ranging from unskilled to professional.  They were given $4.50 just for turning up. 
  • Participants drew lots for their role. A confederate (Mr Wallace) was always the 'learner' while the true participant was the 'teacher'. An 'experimenter' (another confederate) wore a lab coat. Participants were told they could leave the study at any time. The learned was strapped into a chair in another room and wired with electronics. The teacher had to give the learner an increasingly severe electric 'shock' each time he made a mistake on a task (learning word pairs). The teachers weren't told that the shocks were all fake and that Mr Wallace was an actor. 
  • Shocks started at 15 volts (labelled 'light shock') and rose through 30 levels to 450 volts ('danger - severe shock'). At 300 volts 'intense shock' the learner pounded on the wall and gave no response to the next question. After the 315-volt shock the learner pounded on the wall again but gave no further response. 
  • When the teacher turned to the experimenter for guidance, he gave a standar instruction: 'Absence of response should be treated as a wrong answer'. If the teacher felt unsure about continuing, the experimenter used a sequence of 4 standard 'prods', including - 'Please continue' or 'please go on', 'The experiment requires that you continue', 'It is absolutley essential that you continue' and 'You have no other

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Obedience: Milgram's research

  • Obedience: Milgram's research:
  • AO1:
  • Key study: MIlgram's origional obedience study:
  • Procedure - Milgram recruited 40 male participants through newspaper ads and postal flyers. The ad said he was looking for participants for a memory study. Participants were aged between 20 and 50, in jobs ranging from unskilled to professional.  They were given $4.50 just for turning up. 
  • Participants drew lots for their role. A confederate (Mr Wallace) was always the 'learner' while the true participant was the 'teacher'. An 'experimenter' (another confederate) wore a lab coat. Participants were told they could leave the study at any time. The learned was strapped into a chair in another room and wired with electronics. The teacher had to give the learner an increasingly severe electric 'shock' each time he made a mistake on a task (learning word pairs). The teachers weren't told that the shocks were all fake and that Mr Wallace was an actor. 
  • Shocks started at 15 volts (labelled 'light shock') and rose through 30 levels to 450 volts ('danger - severe shock'). At 300 volts 'intense shock' the learner pounded on the wall and gave no response to the next question. After the 315-volt shock the learner pounded on the wall again but gave no further response. 
  • When the teacher turned to the experimenter for guidance, he gave a standar instruction: 'Absence of response should be treated as a wrong answer'. If the teacher felt unsure about continuing, the experimenter used a sequence of 4 standard 'prods', including - 'Please continue' or 'please go on', 'The experiment requires that you continue', 'It is absolutley essential that you continue' and 'You have no other

Comments

No comments have yet been made