Frying method 2- Deep-fat frying

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  • It is carried out in a deep pan or electric deep pan fryer with oil that is several centimetres deep.
  • Most foods
  • Quick method
  • Gives flavour
  • Adds exta fat (oil) which makes it an unhealthy method
  • Deep frying (also referred to as deep-fat frying) is a cooking method in which food is submerged in hot fat, most commonly oil.
  • Normally, a deep fryer or chip pan is used for this; industrially, a pressure fryeror vaccum fryer may be used. Deep frying may also be perfomed using oil that is heated in a pot. Deep frying is classified as a dry heat cooking method because no water is used.
  • Typically, deep frying cooks foods quickly: all sides of a food are cooked simultaneously as oil has a high rate of heat conduction.
  • Deep frying food is defined as a process where food is completely submerged in hot oil at temperatures typically between 177 °C and 191 °C. One common method for preparing food for deep frying involves adding multiple layers of batter around the food, such as cornmeal, flour, or tempura; breadcrumbs may also be used. After the food is submerged in oil, the surface of it begins to dehydrate and it undergoes Maillard reactions which break down sugars and proteins, creating the golden brown exterior of the food.Once the surface is dehydrated, it forms a crust which prevents further oil absorption.The heat conducts throughout the food causing proteins to denature, starches to undergo starch gelatinization, and dietary fiber to soften.
  • While most foods need batter coatings for protection, it is not as necessary for cooked noodles and potatoes because their high starch content enables them to hold more moisture and resist shrinking. Meats may be cooked before deep frying to


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