Events in the Sudeten Crisis in 1938

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  • Created by: Lollipop
  • Created on: 30-05-12 17:06
Summary

The Sudeten crisis began in February 1938 when Hitler demanded self-determination for all Germans in Austria and Czechoslovakia.  

The Sudeten Nazi Party demanded union with Germany and started rioting.   They caused so much trouble that the Czechs had to send in the army.   German newsreels showed ‘evidence’ of Czech ‘atrocities’ against the Sudetens.   Hitler threatened to invade.   In May 1938, the Czech government mobilised its army, thinking that the Germans were about to invade.

War seemed near, but Chamberlain decided that it was ‘a quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing’.   At Munich (29 September), Britain and France gave the Sudetenland to Germany.   ‘I believe it is peace for our time’, Chamberlain told the cheering crowd. 

In October 1938, Hitler marched into the Sudetenland.

 

  • The Sudeten crisis began in February 1938 when Hitler demanded self-determination for all Germans in Austria and Czechoslovakia. 
  • Shortly after, Austrian Nazis rioted and invited Hitler to invade, which he did in March, declaring Anschluss.

 

  • It was clear that Hitler wanted to do the same in Czechoslovakia.   The Sudeten Nazi Party was causing strikes and riots.
  • This was a direct threat to Czechoslovakia, which would lose its industrial areas and

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