Effects of early experience and culture on adult relationships

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Influences of childhood and adolescent experiences.

The continuity hypothesis.

Bowlby suggested that our attachment in early childhood would predict our type attachment in later life. It states that children make an internal working model of how they see themselves form this first relationship.

Ainsworth et al, categorised the different attachment styles as secure, insecure-avoidant, insecure-ambivalent. There has been research into if these attachment types carry on into later life.

Secure attachments means good relationships (continuity hypothesis).

 

Waters, Wippman and Sroufe found that children who were classed as securely attached, were more likely to have more social skills.

Jacobson and Willie found that children who were classed as securely attached, were more likely to have more social skills.

Lyons-Ruth, Alpern and Repacholi found that attachment types in 18 month olds were a better predictor of friendship difficulties in 5 year olds.

Hartup et al suggested that children with secure attachments were more likely to popular in nursery and engage in social activities.

Sroufe and Fleeson found insecurely attached children would rely on the teacher’s interactions and emotional support.

Relationship skills are learned from parents (social learning theory).

Parke (1988)- suggests that the child’s family helps shape their relationship skills and social behaviour.

Russell and Finnie (1990)- observed Australian children who were introduced to new peers. The children who were give advice on how to interact with the others by their mother were more popular.

Adolescent relationships.

Bee (1995)- suggested that teenagesrs use

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