Beginnings of the consumer society

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  • Created by: Abigail
  • Created on: 08-12-14 17:18
  • the early years of the 20th century were decades of great uncertainty
  • there was the Great War (1914-18), 1917 Russian Revolution which introduced communism
  • the first 30 years od the 20th century in the USA brought about consumer society
  • popular culture and Hollywood played a key role in changing people's lifestyles, morality and spending patterns
  • Hollywood focused on the elements of glamour and couture which were traditionally associated with the wealthy
  • the sheath dress of the 1920s was made from skin tight shiny satin fabric cut on the bias clinging to the body outline giving the impression of near nudity

1920s + 30s:

  • in France, designer Coco Chanel created the modern woman
  • she designer comfortable, loose blouses, chemise dresses and clothes that were relaxed
  • it also promoted health
  • these clothes were deisnged to be worn without corsets
  • fewer linings were included to make them lighter and more flexible
  • Chanel believed fashion must meet the needs to the modern woman, giving freedom of movement
  • in 1916 she began using knitted jersey fabrics that were relatively cheap and by 1918 she was producing cardigans
  • her clothes broke away from the fussy over decorated clothing from the 19th century
  • she adapted mens tailoring and produced classic suits that had short skirts
  • she relied on good cuts, finishing and high quality fabric
  • in the 20s, clothing that had previously only been available to the upper class was now accessible on the street
  • this was a dramatic change for ordinary people who had previously everyday wear and 'best' clothes that were to last for a few years
  • the developing style of clothes accompanied with a lower price tag so therefore social classes were not immediately recognisable through what was worn
  • most middle classed Americans had radios…


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