Wuthering Heights

The characters of Wuthering heights

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Main Event 1

Heathcliff seeing Catherine's Ghost: Chapter 3

  • This is the first time Heathcliff is vulnerable:
  • -'Heathcliff stood near the entrance, in his shirt and trousers; with a candle dripping over his fingers, and his face as white as the wall behind him. The first creak of the oak startled him like an electric shock: the light leaped from his hold to a distance of some feet, and his agitation was so extreme that he could hardly pick it up.'
  • -'he continues, crushing his nail into his palms, and grinding his teeth to subdue the maxillary convultions'
  • -What can you mean by talking in this way to me!' thundered Heathcliff with savage vehemence. 'How- how dare you, under my roof- God! he's mad to speak so!' And he struck his forehead with rage.'
  • -He got onto the bed, and wrenched open the lattice, bursting as he pulled at it, into an uncontrolable passion of tears'
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Main Event 2

Heathcliff comes to Wuthering Heights (Chapter 4 page 36)

  • At first Catherine doesn't like Heatchcliff but she soon warms to him.
  • -'We crouded round, and, over, Miss Cathy's head, I had a peep at a dirty, ragged black-haired child; big enough to walk and talk- indeed, its face looked older than Catherine's- yes, when it was set on its feet it only stared around, and repeated over and over again teh same gibberish that nobody could understand.'
  • -'gypsy brat' and 'stupid little thing' said by Nelly
  • -They all call him 'it'; 'Mr Earnshaw told me to wash it, and give it clean things, and let it sleep with the children.'
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Main Event 3

Mr Earnshaw dies (End of Chapter V)

  • 'A high wind blustered round the house, and roared in the chimney: it sounded wild and stormy, yet it was not cold' -reflection of the atmosphere at Wuthering Heights
  • -'Oh, he's dead, Heathcliff! he's dead!'

 

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Main Event 4

Catherine and Heathliff go to Thrushcross Grange (Chapter 6)

  • -'The idiots' -how Heathcliff describes the Lintons
  • -'I had Cathy by the hand'
  • -'Nelly: I heard his abominable snorting. She did not yell out - no! she would have scorned to do it, if she had been spitted on the horns of a mad cow. I did, though: I vociferated curses enough to annihilate any fiend in Christendom; and I got a stone and thrust it between his jaws, and tried with all my might to cram it down his throat.'
  • -'Afterwards, they dried and combed her beautiful hair, and gave her a pair of enormous slippers, and wheeled her to the fire; and I left her, as merry as she could be, dividing her food between the little dog and Skulker, whose nose she pinched as he ate; and kindling a spark of spirit in the vacant blue eyes of the Lintons - a dim reflection from her own enchanting face. I saw they were full of stupid admiration; she is so immeasurably superior to them - to everybody on earth, is she not, Nelly?'
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Main event 5

When Catherine returns from Thrushcross Grange

  • -When Catherine returns from Thrushcross Catherine has been transformed into a lady.
  • -'Why Cathy, Cathy, you are quite a beauty'
  • -'I removed the habit, and there shone forth beneath a grand plaid silk frock, white trousers, and burnished shoes; and, while her eyes sparkled joyfully when the dogs came bounding up to welcome her, she dared hardly touch them lest they should fawn upon her splendid garments. She kissed me gently:'
  • -'Cathy, catching a glimpse of her friend in his concealment, flew to embrace him; she bestowed seven or eight kisses on his cheek within the second, and then stopped, and drawing back, burst into a laugh, exclaiming, 'Why, how very black and cross you look! and how - how funny and grim!'
  • -'I shall not,' replied the boy, finding his tongue at last; 'I shall not stand to be laughed at. I shall not bear it!' And he would have broken from the circle, but Miss Cathy seized him again. '

 

 

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Inbetween event 5 and 6

Catherine and Heathcliff still don't make up and they grow apart over time.

Heathcliff is told to stay away after misbehaving at dinner with the Lintons.

Frances gives birth to Hareton then dies

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Main Event 6

Cathy confides in Nelly telling her of her feelings for Edgar and Heathcliff (Chapter 9)

  • -Catherine about Edgar 'I love the ground under his feet, and the air over his hed, and everything he touches, and evrery word he says - I love all his looks , and all his actions, and him entirely, and altogether.'
  • -Nelly asks Catherine if she should love Edgar still if he wasnt handsome, young, cheerful and rich- '
  • -'I shall not,' replied the boy, finding his tongue at last; 'I shall not stand to be laughed at. I shall not bear it!' And he would have broken from the circle, but Miss Cathy seized him again. 'I shall not,' replied the boy, finding his tongue at last; 'I shall not stand to be laughed at. I shall not bear it!' And he would have broken from the circle, but Miss Cathy seized him again.'
  • -'I don't want your permission for that - I shall marry him: and yet you have not told me whether I'm right.'
  • -'where is the obstacle?' 'HERE! and HERE!' replied Catherine, striking one hand on her forehead, and the other on her breast: 'in whichever place the soul lives. In my soul and in my heart, I'm convinced I'm wrong!'
  • -'It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.'

 

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Main Event 6 continued

  • -'It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.'
  • -'Who is to separate us, pray? They'll meet the fate of Milo! Not as long as I live, Ellen: for no mortal creature. Every Linton on the face of the earth might melt into nothing before I could consent to forsake Heathcliff.'
  • -My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees.My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight,  but necessary.'
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Comments

Cat

it's a great revision set, really helpful, thank you :)

you've spellt Heathcliff incorrectly on the second card though (in the first bullet point), just noticed it- thought you'd like to know so you can correct it if you want. 

good luck with your exams!

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