Why the House of Lords is becoming more significant

The House of Lords and it's political significance

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  • Created by: Hibaq
  • Created on: 17-05-10 11:05

- Used to be considered less significant in the British political system.

- It did contain a large majority of hereditary peers.

- Undemocratic nature meant that the Lords simply could not be allowed to wield any great influence.

- Large government majorities in the Commons became normal. Governments enjoyed majorities of over 100 following the elections of 1983- OPPOSITION IN THE COMMONS WEAK- members of the HOL felt that it was their duty to improve parliamentary opposition to make up for Commons weakness.

- An increasing numbers of the HOL began adopting their roles much more seriously e.g. attending regularly- result of party leadership selecting professional politicians for the Lords to an extent.

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- Reform of removing all but 92 hereditary peers- LORDS AS A CONSEQUENCE OBTAINED GREATER AUTHORITY.

- Lords undemocratic but because of the reform- seen as more politically and socially representative of the country.

- Incorporation of THE EUROPEAN CONVENTION ON HUMAN RIGHT into British Law- Has increased the rights culture by allowing individuals to assert their rights against government which have been accused e.g. of being too dictatorial.

HOL DEFIANCE OF THE WILL OF GOVERNMENT AND PARLIAMENT EXAMPLES:

- House of Lords reform- rejected the complete abolition of hereditary peers

- The legal age of consent for homosexual males- voted twice against this

- Anti- terrorism legislation- Lords defeated the government on this issue- obtained amendments on key issues.

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