Unit 5 Section 2 The Three Gas Laws

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The absolute temperature scale

In thermal physics temperature is measured using the absolute temperature scale. The units of this scale is the kelvin (K).

There is the lowest possible temperature that any object can have called 'absolute zero' at -273(.15) degrees Celsius.

Absolute zero is given a value of zero kelvins (0 K) on the absolute temperature scale.

K = C + 273(.15)

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The three gas laws - Boyle's law

Boyle's law: At a constant temperature and a fixed mass the pressure p and volume V of a gas are inversely proportional.

p x V = constant

The higher the temperature of the gas, the further the curve is from the origin.

Image result for boyles law

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The three gas laws - Charles' law

Charles' law: At a constant pressure and a fixed mass, the volume V of a gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature T.

V / T = constant

In practice a real (non-ideal) gas would condense before reaching 0 K.

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The three gas laws - The pressure law

The pressure law: At a constant volume and a fixed mass, the pressure p of a gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature T.

P / T = constant

The lines always reach the temperature axis at absolute zero.

(http://www.fed.cuhk.edu.hk/~physics/images/exp_pressure_law_graph02.jpg)

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