The awakening and Wuthering Heights

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Critical Reception

The Awakening: -- America 1899 

  • criticised for sexual content
  • shocking female protagonist
  • "mad, bad and ugly"

Wuthering Heights: -- England 1845

  • Religious content controversial -- Negative views about it
  • Published as Ellis Bell instead of Emily Bronte
  • "moral taint"
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Narrative Voice

The Awakening:

  • 3rd person narrator

Wuthering Heights:

  • Multiple Narrators -- Lockwood,

                                      Nelly -- Womans voice

                                                  Working class

  • frame narrative  
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Structure

The Awakening:

  • Cohesive tie -- Ending with suicide
  • Character develops throughout
  • foreshadowing
  • Chronological order as the character develops and changes
  • short period of time -- less than a year

Wuthering Heights:

  • Cohesive tie
  • Frame narrative
  • Spread over a long time period
  • At the end, the love is restored between Heathcliff and Cathy.
  • Moves along in time
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Setting

The Awakening:

  • Pathetic Fallacy: sea -- sensual-- helps awaken her
  • pigoen House
  • Chernier caminada -- where they spent time together -- romantic foreign escape from reality

Wuthering Heights:

  • Yorkshire moors -- open (freedom) -- space, pathetic fallacy
  • Pathetic fallacy -- escape for Heathcliff and Cathy
  • Wuthering Heights -- unwelcoming -- stormy weather
  • Thrushcross Grange -- classical/ traditional -- upper class

Links:

The Awakenings Chernier caminada, is like the yorkshire moors for Heathcliff and Catherine.

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Female Protagonist

The Awakening:

  • Edna (doesnt choose the conventional option)
  •  -- Not a mother woman
  •  -- Opposite to Adele
  •  -- Sensually awoken
  •  -- selfish
  •  -- symbolised by a parrot
  •  -- Unconventional
  •  -- Not too brave (apart from commiting sucicide)
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continued....

 Wuthering Heights:

  • Catherine (chooses the conventional role)
  •  -- free spirit
  •  -- Unconventional
  •  -- Chooses social convention
  •  -- Selfish
  •  -- suicide
  •  -- marries Edgar -- conventional option

Links:

  • Edna goes from being restricted to becoming free.
  • Catherine goes from being free to becoming restricted.
  • -- Same though process
  • They are both selfish
  • They are both women that come to destroy themselves.
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Other female characters:

The Awakening:

  • Adele --
  • Ideal woman and mother opposite to Edna
  • Helps to stimulate Edna's awakening
  • Reiz --
  • Unconventional
  • Shows what Edna could have become
  • She gets shown as a mocking bird

Wuthering Heights:

  • Isabella --
  • Develops throughout the novel.
  • Cathy -- (Catherines daughter)
  • over steps boundaries
  • Helps Hareton
  • Similar to Catherine
  • Heathcliff doesnt like to see Catheine in Cathy
  • Hope for the future
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Male Protagonists

The Awakening:

  • Robert --
  • Cannot commit
  • Desires what he can not have (a married woman)
  • Male version of Edna
  • Both conventional and not
  • Wants a wife not a mistress
  • weakness is show when he returns because hes given in

Wuthering Heights:

  • Heathcliff --
  • Becomes conventional to take revenge (unconventional reasons)
  • Driven by jealousy and marries for revenge
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Other male protagonists

The Awakening:

  •  Leonce --
  • Conventional
  • typical victorian husband
  • lacks passion
  • Edna is his possession
  • Concerned about reputation
  • Arobin --
  • Typical ladies man
  • Only sexual relationships
  • No emotional depths
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continued....

Wuthering Heights:

  • Edgar --
  • conventional (like Leonce)
  • devoted husband
  • restricted by society
  • Linton --
  • Weak, feminine, not typical
  • product of a broken marriage
  • Hareton --
  • hope for the future
  • weak
  • ifeminate
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Context

The Awakening: 

  • Chopins background --
  • Grew up with independant women 
  • Not many male views

Wuthering Heights:

  • Emily Bronte -- 
  • Large family who died young 
  • Father was a vicar -- Religious
  • Grown up with women 
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