textiles

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  • Created by: smithyxx
  • Created on: 06-05-16 19:28

batik

Batik is a technique of wax-resist dyeing applied to whole cloth, or cloth made using this technique

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cotton

cotton comes from cotton plants which grow in hot countries around the world such as America, Africa, Mexico and India.

Cotton is used in many things such as bags, jumpers, socks,   

t-shirts, tea towels, pillow cases, handkerchiefs, bedsheets, jeans

and more.

It is used for these things because its light, sturdy, breather able.

 Cotton is usually used for everyday wear /casual.

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Silk

You get silk from a silk worm (a silk worm is actually a caterpillar) which eats leaves off a mulberry tree.When they turn 1 month old the silk worm start spinning there cocoon. The silk worm will turn yellowish and stop eating when its ready to make its cocoon.

Factories farm silk worms once the silk worm has made its cocoon, they are gathered and dipped in to hot water.

 Cocoons are dipped in hot water to loosen the tightly woven threads that make up a silkworm’s cocoon. These threads are wound into a single silk thread.

China which is the world’s largest producer of silk.

Silk usually feels soft, velvety and smooth. Silk also

 looks and feels a bit like satin. This is why its used for evening wear and ties.

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Wool

Wool comes from sheep. Sheep grow a wool coat and once a year this wool coat is sheared off. The wool is then cleaned to get off all the oil and vegetable

It is then teased and has added special spinning oil to  help the       

           fibres slide and then stick together to forms a fine web.

The wool is then put on to spool and placed on a spinning  frame which makes wool into a thread (yarn). It is then taken off  the machine and wound on to wooden bobbins.

Wool is used to make jumpers, suits, scarves, hats, gloves,blankets and many more

Wool feels soft, light and fluffy. In some jumpers it does feel

 itchy though.

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weaveing

three types of weaving

  • plain weave-Used in muslin, blanket, shirts, suits, etc
  • twill weave- jeans, jackets and curtains.
  • satin weave-used for evening dresses, ties ...

Most fabrics are made by weaving or knitting yarns, non-woven fabrics are made by bonding or felting fibres together.

Woven fabrics are made up of a weft  (the yarn going across the width of the fabric ) and a warp  (the yarn going down the length of the loom).

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knitted

Knitted fabrics can be hand or machine made.

There are two types of knitted fabrics: weft-knitted and warp-knitted.

                                                                           

Weft-knitted fabric is made by looping together long bits of yarn. Itcan be made by either hand or machine. The yarn runs in rows across the fabric. If a stitch is dropped it will create a ladder. The fabric is stretchy and comfortable and is used for socks, T-shirts and jumpers.

In warp-knitted fabric the loops interlock along the length of the fabric. Warp knits are stretchy and do not ladder. Warp-knitted fabric is made by machine. It is used for swimwear and underwear .

                                 

                                          

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knitted 2

In warp-knitted fabric the loops interlock along the length of the fabric. Warp knits are stretchy and do not ladder. Warp-knitted fabric is made by machine. It is used for swimwear and underwear .

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non woven

non-woven fabrics are made by bonding or felting.

Bonded fibres make fabrics by using webs of fibres which are then bonded together with heat or adhesives. They are cheap to produce but not as strong and hardwearing as woven or knitted fabrics. . They are easy to sew, don’t crease easily, do not fray and don’t easily shrink.

 

 

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felting

Wool felt is a non-woven fabric made from animal hair or wool fibres which are matted together using heat and pressure. Felt isn't strong, it doesn't drape and isn't elastic  but it is warm and does not fray. Wool felt is expensive. It is used for hats and slippers and in handcrafts.

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