Social/Moral/Cultural

  • recognise that graphical images and products  should not offend minority groups;  
  • consider moral and cultural implications of graphic  products;  
  • consider ergonomics and use of anthropometric  data when designing products;  
  • understand symbols and signs which are essential  information on packaging.  
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  • Created by: John Bell
  • Created on: 22-04-11 18:45

recognise that graphical images and products shou

 . Robertson’s jam marketed itself with a golliwog, which appeared on every jar. You could collect golliwog stickers and send them off, and then you got a smart metal golliwog badge.

(http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01290/gollywog_1290023a.jpg)(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSVULOLU_r3yYGtIVTzwrgCrT6OWEWlCp0zRtEyyN4kLpmYq8IZVg)(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_d923XJgRugY/TGFmN6pEQSI/AAAAAAAAAPw/MwemY7yHsHg/s320/yorkie_bar.jpg)

.How do these images impact on a particular group or culture?

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Advertising gaffes!

v When Kentucky Fried Chicken entered the Chinese market, to their horror they discovered that their slogan "finger lickin' good" came out as "eat your fingers off"

v Chinese translation also proved difficult for Coke, which took two tries to get it right. They first tried Ke-kou-ke-la because when pronounced it sounded roughly like Coca-Cola. It wasn't until after thousands of signs had been printed that they discovered that the phrase means "bite the wax tadpole"

In Italy, a campaign for "Schweppes Tonic Water" translated the name into the much less thirst quenching "Schweppes Toilet Water".

 
v Coors put its slogan, "Turn It Loose," into Spanish, where it was read as "Suffer From Diarrhea."

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