Romeo and Juliet

  • Created by: leila08
  • Created on: 04-11-18 20:42

Love

  • “As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear” - visual simile
  • O she doth teach the torches to burn bright (1.5.43)
  • It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear (1.5.44-45)
  • She shows a snowy dove trooping with crows (1.5.47)
  • My lips, two blushing pilgrims (1.5.94)
  • It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon (2.2.3-4)
  • My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep (2.2.133-134)
  • Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back (3.2.19)
  • Give me my Romeo, and when I shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night (3.2.21-24) 
  • Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical! Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! (3.2.75-76)
  • Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s a drink – I drink to thee (4.3.58)
  • O woe! O woeful, woeful, woeful day! Most lamentable day, most woeful day (4.5.49-50)
  • How doth my Juliet? That I ask again, For nothing can be ill if she be well (5.1.15-16)
  • For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes This vault a feasting presence full of light (5.3.85-86)
  • Death hath sucked the honey of thy breath (5.3.92)
  • Death’s pale flag is not advanced there (5.3.96)
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rivalry, conflict and feud

  • “That quench the fire of your pernicious rage”- foreshadowing
  • “Fetch me my rapier, boy”
  • “My only love sprung from my only hate!§”- antithesis
  • “Villain, am I none”
  • “Tybalt, you ratcatcher, will you walk?”- insult
  • “And for thy name, which is no part of thee”-
  • “my life is my foe’s debt”
  • From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, where civil blood makes civil hands unclean (prologue)
  • With their death bury their parents’ strife (prologue)
  • As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee (1.1.62)
  • Fetch me my rapier, boy (1.5.54)
  • A villain that is hither come in spite (1.5.61)
  • I’ll not endure him (1.5.75)
  • If they do see thee, they will murder thee (2.2.70)
  • For this alliance may so happy prove To turn your households’ rancour to pure love (2.3.91-92)
  • The day is hot, the Capels are abroad … For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring (3.1.2,4)
  • Thou are a villain (3.1.54)
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Fate

  • “a pair of star-cross’d lover take their life”-
  • “their death-mark’d love”-
  • “One writ with me in sour misfortune’s book”-
  • “O, I am fortune's fool!”-
  • “As one dead in the bottom of a tomb.”
  • “Then I defy you, stars!”
  • “Unhappy fortune!”
  • “And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars”
  • “A greater power than we can contradict / Hath thwarted our intents.”
  • “Be fickle, fortune, / For then, I hope, thou wilt not keep him long, / But send him back."
  • I fear too early, for my mind misgives Some consequence yet hanging in the stars (1.4.106-107)
  • These violent delights have violent ends (2.6.9)
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Death

  • “Your lives shall pay”- introduces death
  • “What if it be a poison, which the Friar / Subtly hath ministered to have me dead”
  • “Death lies on her like an untimely frost”
  • “A dram of poison, such soon-speeding gear / As will disperse itself through all the veins”
  • “Sweet, so would I / Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing”
  • “Is Romeo slaughtered, and is Tybalt dead?”
  • “'Romeo is banishèd.’ / There is no end, no limit, measure, bound, / In that word's death. No words can that woe sound.”
  • “O happy dagger, / This is thy sheath. There rust, and let me die.”- oxymoron
  • “The fearful passage of their death-marked love “
  • “And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?”
  • With their death bury their parents’ strife (prologue)
  • I fear too early, for my mind misgives Some consequence yet hanging in the stars (1.4.106-107)
  • If they do see thee, they will murder thee (2.2.70)
  • The unlucky manage of this fatal brawl (3.1.134)
  • And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead! (3.2.137)
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Religion

  • My lips, two blushing pilgrims (1.5.94)
  • For this alliance may so happy prove To turn your households’ rancour to pure love (2.3.91-92)
  • Bid her devise Some means to come to shrift (confession) this afternoon (2.4.148-149)
  • I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy (3.5.241)
  • Are you at leisure, holy father, now, Or shall I come to you at evening mass? (4.1.37-38)
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Marriage

  • Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine (2.2.127)
  • Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow (2.2.143)
  • Thou consent to marry us today (2.3.64)
  • For this alliance may so happy prove To turn your households’ rancour to pure love (2.3.91-92)
  • There she shall at Friar Lawrence’ cell Be shrived and married (2.4.151-152)
  • She shall be married to this noble earl (3.4.21)
  • But fettle your fine joints ‘gainst Thursday next, To go with Paris to Saint Peter’s Church, Or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither (3.5.153-155)

 

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Family honour

  • A dog of the house of Capulet moves me (1.1.7)
  • The quarrel is between our masters, and us their men (1.1.17)
  • Is she a Capulet? O dear account! My life is my foe’s debt (1.5.116-117)
  • My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! (1.5.137-138)
  • Deny thy father and refuse thy name (2.2.34)
  • Be but sworn my love, And I’ll no longer be a Capulet (2.2.35-36)
  • If they do see thee, they will murder thee (2.2.70)
  • For this alliance may so happy prove To turn your households’ rancour to pure love (2.3.91-92)
  • Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries That thou hast done me, therefore turn and draw (3.1.59-60)

 

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Women

  • My child is yet a stranger in the world (1.2.8)
  • The orchard walls are high and hard to climb (2.2.63)
  • I should adventure for such merchandise (2.2.84)
  • Or if thou think’st I am too quickly won, I’ll frown and be perverse, and say thee nay (2.2.95-96)
  • O for a falc’ners voice, To lure this tassel-gentle back again (2.2.158-159)
  • ******* is hoarse, and may not speak aloud (2.2.160)
  • Though I am sold, Not yet enjoyed (3.2.27-28)
  • She will be ruled In all respects by me (3.4.13-14)
  • How, will she none? Doth she not give us thanks? Is she not proud? (3.5.142-143)
  • And you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend (3.5.191)
  • And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, For by my soul, Ill ne’er acknowledge thee (3.5.192-193)
  • Talk not to me, for I’ll not speak a word. Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee (3.5.202-203)
  • O bid me leap, rather than marry Paris (4.1.77)

 

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Youth

  • Out of her favour where I am in love (1.1.159)
  • O heavy lightness, serious vanity (1.1.169)
  • It is an honour that I dream not of (1.3.67)
  • I’ll look to like, if looking liking move (1.3.98)
  • Rosaline’s … quivering thigh (2.1.17-19)
  • O swear not by the moon, th’inconstant moon (2.2.109)
  • It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden, too like the lightning (2.2.118-119)
  • With Rosaline, my ghostly father! no; I have forgot that name (2.3.45-46)
  • What a change is here (2.3.65)
  • Thou chid’st me oft for loving Rosaline (2.3.81)
  • Wisely and slow, they stumble that run fast (2.3.94)
  • Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron all in black, And learn me how to lose a winning match (3.2.10-12)
  • Come, Night, come, Romeo, come, thou day in night (3.2.17)
  • It was the nightingale, and not the lark (3.5.2)
  • O shut the door, and when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past cure, past help! (4.1.44-45)

 

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Masculinity

  • The quarrel is between our masters, and us their men (1.1.17)
  • As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee (1.1.62)
  • ***** love for pricking, and you beat love down (1.4.28)
  • Fetch me my rapier, boy (1.5.54)
  • Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries That thou hast done me, therefore turn and draw (3.1.59-60)

 

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Hate

  • From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, where civil blood makes civil hands unclean (prologue)
  • With their death bury their parents’ strife (prologue)
  • As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee (1.1.62)
  • A villain that is hither come in spite (1.5.61)
  • I’ll not endure him (1.5.75)
  • If they do see thee, they will murder thee (2.2.70)
  • Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? (3.2.97)
  • Proud can I never be of what I hate (3.5.147)
  • How, how, how, how, chopt-logic? What is this? (3.5.149)
  • Out, you green-sickness carrion! Out, you baggage! You tallow-face! (3.5.156-157)
  • Hang thee, young baggage, disobedient wretch! (3.5.160)
  • See what a scourge is laid upon your hate (5.3.292)
  • All are punished (5.3.295)

 

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Authority

  • Let us take the law of our sides, let them begin (1.1.33)
  • If ever you disturb our streets again, your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace (1.1.87-88)
  • Let Romeo hence in haste, Else, when he is found, that hour is his last (3.1.185-186)
  • All are punished (5.3.295)
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rivalry, conflict and feud 2

  • O calm, dishonourable, vile submission (3.1.66)
  • A plague a’both your houses! (3.1.83/91-92/97)
  • Either thou or I, or both, must go with him (3.1.120)
  • The unlucky manage of this fatal brawl (3.1.134)
  • Proud can I never be of what I hate (3.5.147)
  • How, how, how, how, chopt-logic? What is this? (3.5.149)
  • Out, you green-sickness carrion! Out, you baggage! You tallow-face! (3.5.156-157)
  • Hang thee, young baggage, disobedient wretch! (3.5.160)
  • See what a scourge is laid upon your hate (5.3.292)
  • All are punished (5.3.295)
  • O brother Montague, give me thy hand (5.3.296)
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