Rapoports (1982)

Cue cards for sociologists within family diversity.

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RAPOPORTS BASICS (1982)

  • First to point out the family structure and patterns are diverse.
  • 1978, 20% of families consisted of married couples with children.
  • Decline in the proportion of households with married couple and dependent children, now only 23% (social trends)
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DIFFERENT KINDS OF DIVERSITY

  • ORGANISATIONAL DIVERSITY = different family types have different structures/patterns. Some one partner at work, some dual-income. Increasing numbers of reconsistuted families.
  • CULTURAL DIVERSITY = Different lifestyles of families in different ethinic origins and religious beliefs.
  • CLASS/ECONOMIC DIVERSITY = differences between family relationships and lifestyles of working-class, middle-class and upper-class families.
  • LIFE-COURSE DIVERSITY = changes for the different time of life of the family. Eg. newly married couples, couples with dependent children and couples with adult children.
  • COHORT DIVERSITY = different generations/ people born at the same time may have similar experiences of family life due to common experience of wider social and historical events.
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ROBERT CHESTER (1985)

  • Majority of people in Britain still live at least some part of their life in a nuclear family strucure.
  • Most people want to live in a nuclear type arrangement.
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VARIATIONS IN THE NUCLEAR STRUCTURE - EXTENDED FAM

PETER WILMOTT (1980)

  • Dispersed extended family is a form that is becoming more dominant in Britain.
  • In times of emergency, extended kin are invaluable.
  • In modern Britain kinship is largely chosen and flourishes.

DISPERSED EXTENDED FAMILIES = two or more related families who co-operate with each other even though they may live some distance apart. contact are fairly frequent.

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JULIA BRANNEN (2003)

  • Agrees with Wilmott's view.
  • There are strong intergenerational (between generations) links in British families.
  • Because people are living longer therefore could have up to 4 generations in one family.
  • Grandparents increasingly helping with childcare, divorce, lone-parenthood.
  • Characterised contemporary family strucutres as a Beanpole Family.
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