Privation & the effects of institutionalisation.

Privation & the effects of institutionalisation. 

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Genevieve
  • Created on: 21-12-10 13:30

Privation & the effects of institutionalisation.

Rutter et al. Research on 111 Romanian orphans in the UK

By the age of 4 they'd caught up with age related milestones.

The research showed by the later children were adopted the slower their progress.

The longer a child experiences emotional and physical deprivation the longer it takes to recover but recovery IS possible.


1 of 7

Privation & the effects of institutionalisation.

Quinton et al -ex institutionalised women.

Researchers followed a group of ex-institutionalised women.

They showed extreme difficulties when parenting.

They were less sensitive to their children's needs when compared to who?

The control group.

As a result the children were?

More frequently in care.

Reason:

The women had inadequate models of parents.

2 of 7

Privation & the effects of institutionalisation.

Rutter et al other Romanian orphans

They followed a group of romanian orphans ages 4, 6 and 11. They were adopted.

The orphans had experienced extreme physical and emtional privation in the early years of their lives.  

They showed normal levels of development when compared to children in the UK who were adopted at the same time. 

Conclusions:

Children who are adopted after 6 months were superficially accepting to any carer.

The research suggest that the long term effects of privation may not be as severe as first thought providing the child has the opportunity to form and attachment in the first 6 months of their life.

3 of 7

Privation - The Czech twins

The Czech twins

Had a normal development for the first year of their life, and then for 5 & a half years they were confined to their aunt's cellar. 

Upon discovery of the twins were?

Physically dwarfed & couldn't speak properly.

They both later went on to make full recoveries. 

This case suggests the effects of privation are reversible.

Why does their case challenge Bowlby's maternal deprivation hypothesis?

The concept of monotropy - The twins were able to bond with each other, infant-infant bond as opposed to a mother-child bond.

4 of 7

Privation - The Czech twins

Problems with the evidence:

It's retrospective - we can't be sure of the actual conditions the child endured. 

We cannot generalise the behaviours - becuase the individuals may have unique characteristics.

The effects of privation may be reversed by/from?

Good quality emotional care is offered at a sufficiently young age. 

5 of 7

Privation -The Case of Genie

The Case of Genie

Confined to one room for 13 years, had no emotional attachment with anyone.

This resulted in:

Her being physically under developed. 

Without the ability to speak.

Why did she not make a full recovery?

She was confined to one room for 13 years and wasn't able to form an attachment with anyone therefore no one looked after her physically, emotionally and psychologically. 

This individual case suggests privation is not reversible, however we can't generalise because?

 The individual may have unique characteristics.

 

6 of 7

Are the effects of institutionalisation reversible

The case of Genie suggests the effects of privation aren't reversible.

The Czech twins case suggests the effects of privation are reversible.

Rutter et al research on romanian orphans suggest that the long term effects of privation may not be as severe as first thought providing the child has the opportunity to form and attachment in the first 6 months of their life.

Research on 111 romanian orphans suggests that t he longer a child experiences emotional and physical deprivation the longer it takes to recover but recovery IS possible.

What is a feral child?

Children who've grown up with minimal human contact or non at all. 

7 of 7

Comments

Jaz Morse

Very helpful (: Thank you! Could do with some dates to go with the research, though, and I don't know about anyone else, but I couldn't see the full card?

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all resources »