Plastic Moulding

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  • Created by: Sophie :)
  • Created on: 06-06-13 09:13

Press Forming

Press Forming is used with thermosetting plastics.

Process:

  • A 'slug' of thermosetting powder is placed into the 'female' mould.
  • A former (or male mould) is pressed into and pushes the plastic into the mould.
  • Very high temperatures and pressures are needed to liquefy the powder.
  • The plastic is set into a permanent shape.
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Vacuum forming

Vacuum forming is used with thermoplastics.

Process:

  • a mould is a put on the vacuum bed.
  • the bed is lifted close to the heated plastic.
  • the air is sucked from under the plastic, creating a vacuum.
  • this forces the plastic onto the mould.
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Blow moulding

Blow moulding is used with thermosetting and thermoplastics.

Process:

  • A tube of softened plastic is inserted into the mould.
  • Air is injected into the mould which expands the plastic into the shape of the mould.

This method produces hollow shapes :)

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Die Casting

Die Casting is used with thermoplastics.

Process:

  • The material is melted and poured into the die (mould). Simples :)

Some plastic resins can be cold-poured into the mould. they harden and set through a chemical reaction.

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Injection moulding

Injection moulding is used with thermosetting and thermoplastics.

It is similar to die casting but uses a closed mould and high pressure.

The moulds are made from tool steel - quite expensive.

The plastic in melted in built-in heaters.

it is an automatic and continuous process.

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Extrusion moulding

Extrusion moulding is used with thermoplastics.

Process:

  • The material is melted and forced under pressure through a die(mould).
  • There is a built-in heater.
  • It produces long continuous strips of moulding the same size as the exit hole.
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