Media Terminology

terminology for media

HideShow resource information

Diagetic sounds

Diagetic Sounds:

·       voices of characters 

·       sounds made by objects in the story 

·       music represented as coming from instruments in the story space ( = source music)

Diegetic sound is any sound presented as originated from source within the film's world 

Diagetic sound can be either on screen or off screen depending on whatever its source is within the frame or outside the frame. 

1 of 8

Non-Diagetic sounds

Non Diagetic sounds:

Sound whose source is neither visible on the screen nor has been implied to be present in the action:

·       narrator's commentary

·       sound effects which is added for the dramatic effect

·       mood music

Non-diegetic sound is represented as coming from the a source outside story space. 

The distinction between diegetic or non-diegetic sound depends on our understanding of the conventions of film viewing and listening.  We know of that certain sounds are represented as coming from the story world, while others are  represented as coming from outside the space of the story events.  A play with diegetic and non-diegetic conventions can be used to create ambiguity (horror), or to surprise the audience (comedy).

2 of 8

Terminology

Audience: The group of consumers for whom the media text was constructed as well as anyone else who is exposed to the text.

Connotation: A description of value, meaning or ideology associated with a media text.

Construct or Construction: As a verb, the process by which a media text is shaped and given meaning. This process is subject to a variety of decisions and is designed to keep the audience interested in the text.

As a noun, a fictional or documentary text that appears to be "natural" or a "reflection of reality" but is, in fact, shaped and given meaning through the process already described.

Critical: A reflective position on the meaning, biases or value messages of a text. Critical Viewing is the ability to use critical thinking skills to view, question, analyze and understand issues presented overtly and covertly in movies, videos, television and other visual media.

3 of 8

Terminology

Deconstruct: To take apart, analyze, or break down a media text into its component parts in order to understandhow and why it was created.

Demographics: Recognizable characteristics of media consumers such as age, gender, education and income level.

Denotation: A description of a media text indicating its common sense, obvious meaning.

Docudrama: A filmed dramatization based on fact that combines documentary and fictional elements. In the production process, "based on" allows the creators of the text wide creative latitude. At its best, a docudrama can be a skillful representation of a real person or event.

4 of 8

Terminology

Genre: A category of media texts characterized by a particular style, form or content.

Ideology: How we as individuals understand the world in which we live. This understanding involves an interaction between our individual psychology and the social structures that surround us. Mediating between these are the individual processes of communication, as well as the technological processes of the mass media.

Industry: The agencies and institutions involved with the production of media texts. The term is also used in a more narrow sense to describe the commercial production of media texts for the purpose of making a profit.

Jolts: Moments in a media text that are generated by a broad comedy, a violent act, movement within a frame, a loud noise, rapid editing, a profanity or a sexually explicit representation—all of which are calculated to engage an audience's excitement.

5 of 8

Terminology

Mass Media: Media Education The process by which individuals learn the technical production skills associated with creating media texts. Traditionally, it has not included the intellectual processes of critical consumption or deconstruction; however, modern interpretations often include these processes.

Media Literacy: The process of understanding and using the mass media in an assertive and non-passive way. This includes an informed and critical understanding of the nature of the media, the techniques used by them and the impact of these techniques.

Medium: The singular form of "media." This term usually describes individual forms such as radio, television, film etc.

Media: The plural form of "medium." This term has come to mean all the industrial forms of mass communication combined.

6 of 8

Terminology

Psychographics: A more sophisticated form of demographics that includes information about the psychological and sociological characteristics of media consumers, such as attitudes, values, emotional responses and ideological beliefs.

Representation: The process by which a constructed media text stands for, symbolizes, describes or represents people, places, events or ideas that are real and have an existence outside the text.

Technology: The machinery, tools and materials required to produce a media text. In media literacy terms, technology greatly impacts upon the construction and connotation of a text.

Text: The individual results of media production: a movie, a TV episode, a book, an issue of a magazine or newspaper, an advertisement, an album, a CD, etc.

7 of 8

Terminology

Media Literacy: The process of understanding and using the mass media in an assertive and non-passive way. This includes an informed and critical understanding of the nature of the media, the techniques used by them and the impact of these techniques.

Medium: The singular form of "media." This term usually describes individual forms such as radio, television, film etc.

Media: The plural form of "medium." This term has come to mean all the industrial forms of mass communication combined.

Narrative: The telling of a plot or story. In a media text, narrative is the coherent sequencing of events across time and space.

Negotiate: The process by which members of the audience individually or collectively interpret, deconstruct and find meaning within a media text.

8 of 8

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Media Studies resources:

See all Media Studies resources »See all resources »