Measure for Measure Quotes

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Bobbi
  • Created on: 15-05-13 09:06


Nay, but I know 'tis so: I saw him arrested, saw
him carried away; and, which is more, within these
three days his head to be chopped off.
I am too sure of it; and it is for getting
Madam Julietta with child. (1.2.3)

1 of 46


From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty:
As surfeit is the father of much fast,
So every scope by the immoderate use
Turns to restraint. Our natures do pursue,
Like rats that ravin down their proper bane,
A thirsty evil; and when we drink we die. (1.2.3)

2 of 46


Thus, what with the war, what with the sweat, what
with the gallows and what with poverty, I am
custom-shrunk. (1.2.4)

3 of 46


All houses in the suburbs of Vienna must be
pluck'd down. (1.2.5)

4 of 46


And have you nuns no farther privileges?
Are not these large enough?
Yes, truly; I speak not as desiring more;
But rather wishing a more strict restraint
Upon the sisterhood, the votarists of Saint Clare. (1.4.1)

5 of 46


but it is I
That, lying by the violet in the sun,
Do as the carrion does, not as the flower,
Corrupt with virtuous season. [...]
What dost thou, or what art thou, Angelo?
Dost thou desire her foully for those things
That make her good? (2.2.27)

6 of 46


No, holy father; throw away that thought;
Believe not that the dribbling dart of love
Can pierce a complete bosom. Why I desire thee
To give me secret harbour, hath a purpose
More grave and wrinkled than the aims and ends
Of burning youth. (1.3.1)

7 of 46


Then, Isabel, live chaste, and, brother, die:
More than our brother is our chastity. (2.4.23)

8 of 46


[...] This night's the time
That I should do what I abhor to name,
Or else thou diest to-morrow.
Thou shalt not do't.
O, were it but my life,
I'd throw it down for your deliverance
As frankly as a pin. (3.1.11)

9 of 46


Behold, behold. where Madam Mitigation comes! I
have purchased as many diseases under her roof as come to--
Second Gentleman
To what, I pray?
Second Gentleman
To three thousand dolours a year.
First Gentleman
Ay, and more.
A French crown more.
First Gentleman
Thou art always figuring diseases in me; but thou
art full of error; I am sound. (1.2.9)

10 of 46


Hold therefore, Angelo:--
In our remove be thou at full ourself;
Mortality and mercy in Vienna
Live in thy tongue and heart: old Escalus,
Though first in question, is thy secondary.
Take thy commission.
your scope is as mine own
So to enforce or qualify the laws
As to your soul seems good.

11 of 46


We have strict statutes and most biting laws.
The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds,
Which for this nineteen years we have let slip;
Even like an o'ergrown lion in a cave,
That goes not out to prey. Now, as fond fathers,
Having bound up the threatening twigs of birch,
Only to stick it in their children's sight
For terror, not to use, in time the rod
Becomes more mock'd than fear'd; so our decrees,
Dead to infliction, to themselves are dead;
And liberty plucks justice by the nose;
The baby beats the nurse, and quite athwart
Goes all decorum. (1.3.3)

12 of 46


I do fear, too dreadful:
Sith 'twas my fault to give the people scope,
'Twould be my tyranny to strike and gall them
For what I bid them do: for we bid this be done,
When evil deeds have their permissive pass
And not the punishment. Therefore indeed, my father,
I have on Angelo imposed the office;
Who may, in the ambush of my name, strike home,
And yet my nature never in the fight
To do in slander. (1.3.4)

13 of 46


'Tis set down so in heaven, but not in earth. (2.4.5)

14 of 46


Thus can the demigod Authority
Make us pay down for our offence by weight
The words of heaven; on whom it will, it will;
On whom it will not, so; yet still 'tis just. (1.2.2)

15 of 46


How would you be,
If He, which is the top of judgment, should
But judge you as you are? O, think on that;
And mercy then will breathe within your lips,
Like man new made. (2.2.11)

16 of 46


Be you content, fair maid;
It is the law, not I condemn your brother:
Were he my kinsman, brother, or my son,
It should be thus with him: he must die tomorrow. (2.2.17)

17 of 46


'An Angelo for Claudio, death for death!'
Haste still pays haste, and leisure answers leisure;
Like doth quit like, and MEASURE still FOR MEASURE.
Then, Angelo, thy fault's thus manifested;
Which, though thou wouldst deny, denies thee vantage.
We do condemn thee to the very block
Where Claudio stoop'd to death, and with like haste.
Away with him! (5.1.49)

18 of 46


Let him not die. My brother had but justice,
In that he did the thing for which he died:
For Angelo,
His act did not o'ertake his bad intent,
And must be buried but as an intent
That perish'd by the way: thoughts are no subjects;
Intents but merely thoughts. (5.1.20)

19 of 46


Better it were a brother died at once,
Than that a sister, by redeeming him,
Should die for ever

20 of 46


I will encounter darkness as a bride,
And hug it in mine arms.(3.1.9)

21 of 46


O, were it but my life,
I'd throw it down for your deliverance
As frankly as a pin. (3.1.12)

22 of 46


Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;
To lie in cold obstruction and to rot;
This sensible warm motion to become
A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit
To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice;
To be imprison'd in the viewless winds,
And blown with restless violence round about
The pendent world; or to be worse than worst
Of those that lawless and incertain thought
Imagine howling: 'tis too horrible!
The weariest and most loathed worldly life
That age, ache, penury and imprisonment
Can lay on nature is a paradise
To what we fear of death.

23 of 46


Sir, I have been an unlawful bawd time out of mind;
but yet I will be content to be a lawful hangman. I
would be glad to receive some instruction from my
fellow partner. (4.2.2)

24 of 46


In our remove be thou at full ourself;
Mortality and mercy in Vienna
Live in thy tongue and heart

25 of 46


this we came not to,
Only for propagation of a dower
Remaining in the coffer of her friends,
From whom we thought it meet to hide our love
Till time had made them for us. But it chances
The stealth of our most mutual entertainment
With character too gross is writ on Juliet.

26 of 46


This being granted in course,--and now follows
all,--we shall advise this wronged maid to stead up
your appointment, go in your place; if the encounter
acknowledge itself hereafter, it may compel him to
her recompense: and here, by this, is your brother
saved, your honour untainted, the poor Mariana
advantaged, and the corrupt deputy scaled. (

27 of 46


I beseech your highness, do not marry me to a whore.
Your highness said even now, I made you a duke:
good my lord, do not recompense me in making me a cuckold. (5.1.29)

28 of 46


Well, Angelo, your evil quits you well:
Look that you love your wife; her worth yours.
I find an apt remission in myself;
And yet here's one in place I cannot pardon. (5.1.61)

29 of 46


[To ISABELLA] If he be like your brother, for his sake
Is he pardon'd; and, for your lovely sake,
Give me your hand and say you will be mine.
He is my brother too: but fitter time for that. (5.1.61)

30 of 46


My Dear Isabel,
I have a motion much imports your good;
Whereto if you'll a willing ear incline,
What's mine is yours and what is yours is mine.
So, bring us to our palace; where we'll show
What's yet behind, that's meet you all should know. (5.1.64)

31 of 46


I hold you as a thing ensky'd and sainted.
By your renouncement an immortal spirit,
And to be talk'd with in sincerity,
As with a saint. (1.4.5)

32 of 46


Supply me with the habit and instruct me
How I may formally in person bear me
Like a true friar. More reasons for this action
At our more leisure shall I render you; (1.3.4

33 of 46


Hark how I'll bribe you: good my lord, turn back.
[...] Not with fond shekels of the tested gold,
Or stones whose rates are either rich or poor
As fancy values them; but with true prayers
That shall be up at heaven and enter there
Ere sun-rise, prayers from preserved souls,
From fasting maids whose minds are dedicate
To nothing temporal.

34 of 46


When I would pray and think, I think and pray
To several subjects. Heaven hath my empty words;
Whilst my invention, hearing not my tongue,
Anchors on Isabel: Heaven in my mouth,
As if I did but only chew his name;
And in my heart the strong and swelling evil
Of my conception.

35 of 46


It is a man's voice. Gentle Isabella,
Turn you the key, and know his business of him;
You may, I may not; you are yet unsworn.
When you have vow'd, you must not speak with men
But in the presence of the prioress:
Then, if you speak, you must not show your face,
Or, if you show your face, you must not speak.
He calls again; I pray you, answer him. (1.2.4)

36 of 46


See you the fornicatress be remov'd.
Let her have all needful but not lavish means; (2.2.6)

37 of 46


Why, you are nothing then: neither maid, widow, nor wife?
My lord, she may be a punk; for many of them are
neither maid, widow, nor wife. (5.1.25)

38 of 46


Ha! little honour to be much believed,

And most pernicious purpose! Seeming, seeming!
I will proclaim thee, Angelo; look for't:
Sign me a present pardon for my brother,
Or with an outstretch'd throat I'll tell the world aloud
What man thou art.

39 of 46


Who will believe thee, Isabel?

My unsoil'd name, the austereness of my life,
My vouch against you, and my place i' the state,
Will so your accusation overweigh,
That you shall stifle in your own report
And smell of calumny. (2.4.18)

40 of 46


Haste you speedily
to Angelo: if for this night he entreat you to his
bed, give him promise of satisfaction. (3.1.12)

41 of 46


Some report a sea-maid spawned him; some, that he
was begot between two stock-fishes. But it is
certain that when he makes water his urine is
congealed ice; that I know to be true: and he is a
motion generative; that's infallible. (3.2.14)

42 of 46


O, death's a great disguiser; and you may add to it.
Shave the head, and tie the beard; and say it was
the desire of the penitent to be so bared before his
death: you know the course is common. (4.2.19)

43 of 46


O my dread lord,
I should be guiltier than my guiltiness,
To think I can be undiscernible,
When I perceive your grace, like power divine,
Hath look'd upon my passes. Then, good prince,
No longer session hold upon my shame,
But let my trial be mine own confession:
Immediate sentence then and sequent death
Is all the grace I beg. (5.1.7)

44 of 46


I am sorry, one so learned and so wise
As you, Lord Angelo, have still appear'd,
Should slip so grossly, both in the heat of blood.
And lack of temper'd judgment afterward. (5.1.14)

45 of 46



46 of 46


No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all resources »