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“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the

 This demonstrates Frost's ironic treatment of the narrator. In the first three stanzas of the poem, the narrator states that the two paths are fundamentally identical in every way. He chose one path and contemplated returning one day to try the other path, but did not agonize over the decision. In the fourth stanza, however, he changes the truth of what happened and describes his path as the one "less traveled by." This shift in the truth allows the man to justify  his life choices and explain why his life turned out the way that it did. The “I-“ shows a sign of interruption and hesitating, he is thinking of what or how he should say what he is about to.

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“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the

 This demonstrates Frost's ironic treatment of the narrator. In the first three stanzas of the poem, the narrator states that the two paths are fundamentally identical in every way. He chose one path and contemplated returning one day to try the other path, but did not agonize over the decision. In the fourth stanza, however, he changes the truth of what happened and describes his path as the one "less traveled by." This shift in the truth allows the man to justify  his life choices and explain why his life turned out the way that it did. The “I-“ shows a sign of interruption and hesitating, he is thinking of what or how he should say what he is about to.

2 of 2

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