Key People in Women's Suffrage 1860-1930 Edexcel AS History

revision card on each of the key people involved in the suffrage movement

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Barbara Leigh Smith (Bodichon) 1827-1891

  • Born into a radical, free-thinking family.
  • Her parents never  married - they didn't see the point.
  • Father was a radical MP who supported women's rights.

She received £300 a year from her parents and this enabled her to throw herself into campaigning for women's rights. She:

  • Set up a progressive school in London that was co-ed, not connected to any particular religious group and took children from a range of different backgrounds.
  • Worked with Caroline Norton on the campaign that resulted in the Divorce and Matrimonial Causes Act.
  • Formed the first Women's Suffrage Committee in 1866, and toured the country holding meetings, converting many women to the cause of female suffrage.
  • Joined with Emily Davis in helping to raise funds for the first women's college (Girton) in Cambridge.
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Josephine Butler 1828-1906

  • Born into a wealthy landowning family in Northumberland.
  • Grew up in a family with strong views about the wrongs of inequality and injustice and the need for social reform. She:
  • Worked with Anne Jemima Clough to establish educational courses for women and in 1867 was appointed president of the North England Council for the Higher Education of Women.
  • Became involved, in1868, in a campaign to persuade Cambridge Uni to allow women to be University students.
  • Worked as a leader of the Ladies' National Association from 1869, which successfully campaigned for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts.
  • Became involved in the campaign against child prostitution, which resulted in the 1885 Criminal Amendment Act that raised the age of consent from thirteen to sixteen.
  • Supported the National Union of Suffrage Societies that campaigned peacefully for female suffrage.
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