Journey's End: scene by scene

Act 1 scene 1

Hardy states that the German attack will come any day now. The audience discovers, via Hardy, that Stanhope uses alcohol to cope with the war. Raleigh arrives and befriends Osborne. The latter tells him not to expect Stanhope to be exactly the same. Stanhope is irritated that Raleigh is in his company/battalion as he believes he will tell Madge about him. Stanhope also shares that he uses whisky to dull the horrors of the war. 

Key significances:

  • Responsibility of leadership & Guilt 
  • Attitudes from the Home Front & attitudes to the Home Front 
  • Injury & Mental Trauma
  • Horror & Suffering & Pity of war
  • Women
  • Love 
  • Heroism & Bravery & Duty
  • Goodness and Conscious
  • Friendship & Compassion 
  • Father Figures
  • Youth
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Act 2 scene 1

They have bacon for breakfast. Trotter and Osborne talk with Rayleigh about their gardens. The war they're fighting isn't what Rayleigh expected. Osborne and Rayleigh discuss rugby. Osborne tells the story of the Germans letting them carry in an injured man to safety. The day of the attack is given. Stanhope threatens to ruin Trotter's circles. Osborne talks about his time on leave with Stanhope. Stanhope angrily insists on censoring (reading) Rayleigh's letter. There is nothing insulting about him- only more hero-worship. Stanhope feels guilty

Key significances:

  • Father figures & Friendship & Guilt 
  • Attitudes from the Home Front & Attitudes to the Home Front 
  • Attitudes to the enemy
  • Women 
  • Grief & Suffering 
  • Military discipline 
  • Goodness and conscious & Compassion 
  • Male brutality 
  • Memories of home 
  • Love 
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Act 2 scene 2

Stanhope talks to the Sargeant-Major about the plans for the coming attack- they are to hold their position. The Colonel arrives and tells Stanhope that a raid must be made (orders of the Brigadier). The Colonel picks Osborne and Rayleigh to complete the raid. Hibbert comes in a whines more about his 'neuralgia'. He says he's leaving to see the doctor. He and Stanhope argue. Stanhope threatens to shoot him. Hibbert tells him to do it. Stanhope doesn't but instead comforts Hibbert. Stanhope explains he feels the same, but it is their duty to stay and fight. Stanhope tells Osborne they have to make a raid. Rayleigh is excited at the prospect of being chosen specially for the raid.  

Key significances:

  • Responsibility of leadership
  • Duty & Heroism & Bravery
  • Injury & Mental Trauma 
  • Horror & Suffering 
  • Grief 
  • Military disciple 
  • Memories of home 
  • Friendship & Compassion
  • Male brutality 
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Act 3 scene 1

Stanhope highlights to the colonel that a daylight raid is equivalent to suicide. Osborne accepts that he will probably die, Stanhope attempts to convince him otherwise. Osborne and Raleigh attempt to keep calm and discuss a whole manner of things. The raid goes ahead and a German soldier is captured and questioned. Osborne is killed and Stanhope is angry. 

Key significances:

  • Father figures & Grief
  • Compassion
  • Responsibility of leadership & Duty
  • Attitudes to the enemy 
  • Horror & Suffering
  • Slaughter 
  • Heroism & Bravery
  • Military discipline 
  • Goodness and conscious & Pity of war
  • Youth 
  • Memories of home 
  • Male Brutality 
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Act 3 scene 2

Trotter, Hibbert and Stanhope derogatorily discuss women before Stanhope gets annoyed at Hibbert. He then becomes irritated with Raleigh, who has elected to stay with the regular soldiers in the trenches rather than come down. Raleigh explains that he is grieving for Osborne, implying that Stanhope is not. Stanhope reveals the extent of his grief, loss and vulnerability. 

Key significances:

  • Responsibility of leadership & Guilt 
  • Injury & Mental Trauma 
  • Attitudes to the enemy
  • Women & Love 
  • Youth 
  • Friendship
  • Male brutality 
  • Slaughter & Suffering & Horror
  • Memories of home 
  • Compassion & Pity of war
  • Grief 
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Act 3 scene 3

The dawn of the day of attack has come. Stanhope convinces Hibbert that he has to go out and fight. The battle begins and Raleigh is injured. He is brought down and Stanhope comforts him, it is clear he is going to die. When he dies Stanhope goes out to join the others in the battle. A shell his the dugout and Raleigh's corpse is buried. 

Key significances:

  • Slaughter & Suffering & Horror 
  • Compassion & Friendship
  • Grief 
  • Goodness and conscious 
  • Guilt 
  • Father figures 
  • Injury 
  • Heroism & Duty
  • Love 
  • Youth 
  • Pity of war  
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Comments

CrypticNite

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really good - very detailed

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