World War 1 Revision Cards

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  • Created by: Elle
  • Created on: 09-05-11 14:47


Lord Kitchener was in charge of the army, when the war broke out, over half a million men joined up in the first 6 weeks as they all wanted revenge on germany as they didnt want to miss out on all of the "Fun" (1914). they all expected the ar to be over by christmas 1914. In 1915 when dora was introduced the government had contorl over peoples lives, they stopeed newspapers, and radios creating rumors as they didnt want people to know about the war. 1915 was the year propaganda was at force because there was so many injuries and need men to go and fight in the war. people thought it was fun but in reality it was hard and brutal. they needed men and fast.

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Government Laws and Acts

DORA: Defence of the relms act, August 1914, allowed censorship to take over factories and mines. the government had contol over peoples lives. They banned certain things like; fireworks,kites,Watered down beers. They could take over farms to help with the rationing problems.

Military Services Act: Febuary 1916, men unmarried 18-41 known as conscription. Punishment for concientiaus objectus. They were all put in jail for not goin in the army.

Derby Scheme: 1915 invite men that are willing to sign up if called upom. the hige lossed lead to conscription. 1. National Registration act Male+Female 15-65. Conscription 18-41.

Lord Kitchener: Serve country, affected by propaganda, it was also a adventure that would be oveer by christmas 1914. also there was a lot of peer pressure on the men.

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There was many casualties after the enemy attacked the trenches after a long period of stalemate.

Spring 1915 it became clear that we needed more men to figth and it was clear that the number of men volountering wouldnt be enough.

The government comsidered conscrition but didnt know wether it would work or not?!.

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