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  • Created by: Peeper
  • Created on: 26-12-17 22:50

What are the purposes of legislation

The main purpose of legislations being created is to raise awareness to the situation and to show support for the peoples right(s). This ensures that care organisations then need to adapt policies and procedures to adapt to that law; giving a framework as to what is expected of care workers.

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Why should we maintain rights?

By keeping rights, it allows service users to feel empowered, positively impacting the users intellectual development. As they will feel valued, trustful, safe and will have confidence in that care setting. It could also raise some users self-esteem as equal care access flourishes users despite differences with no discrimination. Needs are met; raising no concern.

Alternatively, rights should be maintained as legislations ensure no poor practice can take place from organisations as they need to adapt policies and procedures to meet this law; and penalties for staff that do not correctly follow the rules.

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How can we provide information about challenging d

Long-term discriminatory behaviour information is given by long pro-active campaigning to ensure that the message is sent across. To ensure this leguslations require that staff have briefings aout the situation reguarly; as well as displays, campagins and workshops to be annual to allow the message to spread.

However, if discriminatory behaviour happens at the time: staff should stop anyone slurring discrimination and lecturing the person about it.

Filing with the behaviour afterwards should be dealt with lectures about why what the persondid was wrong and telling the victim the steps to make a complaint if needed to. In worst-case scenario legal action could be taken.

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How can we provide information on how to keep serv

To keep users up-to-date with information all about the service; locations of where the service is should be online or locally so users know where to find it; as well as location, opening and closing times along with a clear insight of what type of care is provided, i.e. a nursery, carehome etc... Especially with contact info (phone number). Finally, if the user does not like the options staff should be able to offer alternative services beneficial to the user.

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How to provide information on how complaints proce

Complaint procedures should be provided by staff willingly to let users know they car. Staff shouleither giveout leaflets with contact numbers for customer services or tell the people themselves the steps to take when making a complaint, or telling people what options they have.

The users opinions and views should be took into consideration when dealing with a complaint; this makes the user feel empowered as they are being listened to and it is their right to say what they think. If the issue is dealt with the user will develop trust; if not it may lead to withdrawral or lack of confidence. 

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How to provide advocacy

 Advocacy- Speaking for someone who cant speak for themselves

 Translators can be given to help multi-cultural users get their point across whom cannot speak fluent english. Or a staff member who could inquire other staff members for information about a certain subject if someow the user is not able to. Staff could also translate for the deaf.

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How can we ensure that the child's welfare is para

We can ensure the childs welfare is paramount by encouaging positive expectations of them in learning, listening to them,and not humiliating or smaking them . The workplace can store realtive informaton, such as allergies close, and should have health and safety proceduresin place to keep the child safe.

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How can we ensure effective communication takes pl

Effective communication can be adapted to suit the needs of an individual. An example of adapting to an individuals needs is to use short and simplistic vicabulay so the user can understand. Gestures whilst talking can also help alongside emphasising word, ensuring that the point is being absorbed.

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How can we ensure effective communication takes pl

Effective communication can be adapted to suit the needs of an individual. An example of adapting to an individuals needs is to use short and simplistic vicabulay so the user can understand. Gestures whilst talking can also help alongside emphasising word, ensuring that the point is being absorbed.

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When can confidentiality be broken?

 Confidentiality can be broken when there is a need-to-know basis(doctors needing prescriptions or careworkers swpping shifts), which ensures workers are communicating and flourishing the individuals needs together. 

 Confidentiality can also be broken when the serviceuser is at risk of harm to prevent injury.

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What are the advantagages of record keeping?

Record keeping is handy as it allows care workers to see and compare the users health. Reguarding health; it helps to check past family illnesses, check effectiveness of medication and monitor the users overall health to see if it is declining or getting better.

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What is so bad about confidentiality being broken

If confidentiality is broken, it can lead to the service user feeling embrassed and having a loss of confidence and/or self-esteem; which could even lead to withdrawral of the organisation. 

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What is so bad about confidentiality being broken

If confidentiality is broken, it can lead to the service user feeling embrassed and having a loss of confidence and/or self-esteem; which could even lead to withdrawral of the organisation. 

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What is so bad about confidentiality being broken

If confidentiality is broken, it can lead to the servuce user feeling embrassed and having a loss of confidence and/or self-esteem; which could even lead to withdrawral of the organisation. In worse case scenarios, the user might want to file a complaint or even a lawsuit. It can affect intellectual development of the user.

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Types of confidentiality

   Verbal

Speak in private

 Do not gossip 

 Written 

Locked cabinets

Do not leave files laying around

 Computer

Password locked

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How can we offer children choice?

We can offer children choice through activities they play by engaging in class activities. For example: Offerig children a choice of games they can play,books they read; or choice of what fruit they eat.

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How can we introduce security to early years setti

We can stop children escaping by inserting security measures like: Gates and fences, passwords for local parents to watch, passcodes on doors/locks children can't reach and ID badges.

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How can we give children personal hygiene

We can promote the childrens personal hygeine by encouraging children to cover their mouth when coughing, promoting handwashing.

For the staff:cleaning toys after childrens individual use. 

Deep cleaning the place so there is no chance of infection spreading 

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How can we keep beliefs in an early years setting

"welcome" signs in different languages

Learning abut different beliefs

Bilingal staff

Have visitors

Encourage children to to talk about beliefs

Toys showing different ethnic backgronds

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How can we work in partnership with parents

Keep parents up-to-date with progress

School reports

Reading journals at home

Parents evening 

Accident slips

Homework

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Examples of early years setting

Foster care

Children's day centre

Primary school

Children's Play groups

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How can we encourage children's learning and devel

Singing songs (i.e. counting and the alphabet)

Time for drawing (to help creativity)

Range of reading books

Reading to the class

Range of toys

School trips

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How does legislation help to support rights

By setting laws, the Government is raising awareness on that particular area. Organisations then need to adapt policiesand proceedures to fit that law, if the care organisation does not proviide this;they can be prosectuted. This helps to ensure that the service users have rights that care workers need to meet in the care sector.It helps to ensure that service users are treated with dignity and respect.

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Who are service users

Service users are people who use health resources given by the Government.

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How can we help service users

Provide up to date information

Providing advocacy 

Giving empowerment

Challening discriminatory behaviour 

Effective speech

Information abut complaint procedures

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If the service users needs are not met

This can lead to the service user being angry; possibly wanting to come fourth with a complaints procedure and in the worst case scenerio: a law suit.

Physically, it can lead to: dehydrated,ill,weak,malnourished, tired or even death

Intellectually: No learning, bored, no stimulation

Emotional(ly) :Low self-esteem,targeted,worthless, depressed, lonely, angry

Socially: Isolation, withdrawral, lonely 

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How can care workers support users rights

Effective communication ensures that the language is adapted to suit the individuals needs.

A cheerful tone

Not being patronizing 

Simple language and vocabulary 

Listening to individual needs

Using gestures

Changing the way they speak

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How physical development can be affected

Dehydrated

ill

Weak

Malnourished

Tired

Death

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How intellectual development can be affected

No learning 

Bored

No stimulation 

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How can emotional development be affected

Low self-esteem

Targeted

Worthless 

Depressed

Lonely 

Angry 

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How can social development be affected?

•Isolation

•Lonely 

•Withdrawral 

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How can we ensure security and protection

ID badge

Passcodes

Gates and fences

CCTV camera 

Receptionist

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How can we ensure personal hygiene

Deodorant

Handwash

Brush teeth

Showers

Washing hands

Tie hair

Short hair/nails

Clean clothes

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how can we ensure health and safety

Protective clothing 

Fire drill

Smoke alarm

Wet floor signs

First-aid procedures

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How can we ensure environmental hygiene

Wash surfaces before eating

Mop floors

Hoover

Wash dishes

Deep clean

Correct cutlery

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How can ensure security and protection

ID badge

Passcodes

Gates and fences

CCTV camera

Receptionist 

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How can we ensure effective communication

Language is short, precise and clear

Calm body language

Simple language and vocbulary 

Use gestures

Repeat yourself

Using a cheerful tone

Emphasising words

Not being patronising 

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Empowerment is...

Giving the service user independence but extra support to help them carry out tasks.

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Physical development in Infancy

Infants can sit with their head held steady for a few seconds, if supported

Can get from the lying to sitting position

Learn to crawl 

Learn to walk

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Intellectual development in infancy

Know their own name

They understand and obey a couple of words like “no”, “bye” and gestures

Try and join in with nursery rhymes

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Emotional development in infancy

Bonding with mother and cuddling

Recognize familiar people

•Able to express their feelings trying new things either confident or shy

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Social(ness) in infancy

Babies will smile at their parents

Play alone but near other children

They begin to play with other infants, they share with each other

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Physical development in childhood

Become stronger – growth spurts

Head is bigger, but smaller in proportion to the rest of the body

Muscle tissue increase – baby fat is lost

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Intellectual development in childhood

No longer ego centric

Wider vocabulary

Understand concepts

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Emotional development in childhood

Show affection towards others

Need reassurance from immediate careers

Has quarrels and temper tantrums

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Social(ness) in childhood

Can be separated from career

Make close friendships

  • •Aware of sexual difference, choose to play with same sex
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Intellectual development in adolescences

Aware of what others think about you

Compare own life to lives of others

Start to develop strong feelings about society, e.g. religion and politics

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Emotional development in adolescence

Mood swings

At the same time they are looking for a sense of personal identity, to discover ‘who they are’. One way is by reacting against their parents’ ideas about politics or religion or by drinking and smoking

. Insecurity; a time when our personality is developed, based on our individual characteristics, habits and experiences.

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Social(ness) in childhood adolescence

Take responsibly for themselves –more independent

Influenced heavily by peers

Conflict with parents

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Physical development in adulthood

Gain weight and find it harder to lose weight

Menopause in women – end of periods. 24 – 55 years old take 1 to 4 years

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Intellectual development in adulthood

Never stops learning, there is always something to learn, whether it be a new game or learn what to do with a new job

As adults age they react more slowly and find it more difficult to remember things under pressure. However to balance this they have learned from experience and are better at problem solving and making decisions. This compensates for any decline in intellectual ability over the life stage.

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Emotional development in adulthood

More able to share

Control emotions – sometimes hide them

Sees things from another persons view

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Social(ness) in adulthood

Relationships with parents change

Learn how to behave in a formal social setting – work

They way you socialize changes

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Physical development in elderly

Skins wrinkles – loss of elasticity

Get tired easily

Hair thins and goes gray – some men get bald

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Intellectual development in elderly

Due to the deterioration of the nervous system, they have difficulty remembering things

Reaction times are slower

Become more confused, confusion is temporary, where are dementia cannot be restored as brain cells cease to function

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Social(ness) in elderly

Some older people miss regular contact with workmates, others

enjoy having more time to spend on their hobbies & interests. How

people are affected may depend on their income.

The children of older adults will probably be adults, living their own

lives, sometimes far away. The older person may feel isolated & not

needed, they may have the pleasures of grandchildren, without being

responsible for them

They may suffer bereavement (death) of close friends, partners,

Relatives. They have to adapt to a smaller social circle.

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What is 'inhumane treatment characterised by?

Physical; being hit or punched Verbal; being called names Emotional; being deprived of love Sexual; having intimate relationships with permission Psychological; fear – being afraid

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Effects on user if rights are not met 2

P - scars

I – may not attend school, or when they do can't concentrate

E- unhappy, sad, won't trust again

S – won't go out and socialize

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Aids to help feeding

Cups with special handles

Clothing protector

Food plate guard

Feeding/drinking cup

Adapted utensils

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Feeding aids

•If user has shaky hands it helps for food/drink no to spill, leaving them (not) embarrased

•Service user always has choice of what they want to eat

•Helps with arthiritus/grip support

•Straws help deliever food/jaw problems

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Aids to help dressing

•Shoe horn

•Sock slingshot

•Velcro

•Button grabber

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Dressing aids

•Help when user cannot bend over

•Helps pull up clothes/replaces/helps with buttons if shaky hands

•prevents falls

•Helps user not feel embarassed

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Aids to help mobility

•Shopping trolley

•Walking sticks

•Crutches

•Mobility tray 

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Mobility aids

•Helps to steady balance

•Makes user empowered

•Risks; Falling over and pressure applied possibly causing blisters

•Handling/grip support

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HEALTH AND SOCIAL REVISION

Cards 1-64

good luck revising and believe in yourself

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