Ohime, se tanto amate

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  • Created by: Megan
  • Created on: 11-05-13 10:36

Background

  • Madrigal - Secular work for a group of solo voices, in this case unaccompanied
  • Setting of a text by poet Guarini
  • Published 1603
  • New style, as opposed to the older Renaissance style
  • The word is regarded as the master of music
  • Absence of performance directions
  • Seconda Prattica
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Rhythm and Metre

  • Attempted to reproduce inflations of speech
  • Considerable variety in rhythmic patterns
  • Occuring pattern for 'Ohime' 
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Melody and Word Setting

  • Mainly syllabic for clarity (Bar 42 = First Melismas)
  • Use of tritone interval (diminished 5th, bar 4 beat 2)
    and 7ths
  • Chromaticism and sequence
  • Sigh-like falling 3rd of 'Ohime' 
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Harmony

  • Unprepared dissonance (bar 2 beat 2)
  • False relations 
  • Tierce de Picardie 
  • Tonic and Dominant pedals
  • IIIb-I final cadence
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Tonality

  • Based on Gminor ('Modal' key signature with only one flat)
  • Has sections in Dminor and Bflat major 
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Structure

  • Through-composed, each section of the text being treated differently
  • Falling 'Ohime' is an unifying element as it recurs frequently
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Texture and Performing Forces

  • Five unaccompanied voices, Canto/Quinto/Alto/Tenor/Bass
  • Various textures:
    Paired Alto and Tenor in dialogue with paired Canto and Quinto over sustained Bass (bar 47)
    Homohpony for 3 voices in various groupings (bar 20)
    Homophony for 5 voices (bar 62)
    Some limited imitation
    Free counterpoint
     
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