English Language : Writing To Argue Vocabulary

These set of cards are designed for the English Language exam, and will help you to use better words whenn writing to argue in section B of the exam. These flashcards should eventually develop your vocabulary for writing to argue.

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Irritating

ir·ri·tat·ing

adjective

  1. Causing annoyance, impatience, or mild anger
    • - an irritating child
  2. Causing irritation to a body part
    • - the substance may be irritating to eyes and skin
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Offensive

of·fen·sive

adjective

  1. Causing someone to feel deeply hurt, upset, or angry
    • - the allegations made are deeply offensive to us
    • - offensive language

noun

  1. An organized and forceful campaign to achieve something, typically a political or social end
  • - the need to launch an offensive against crime
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Outrageous

out·ra·geous

adjective

  1. Shockingly bad or excessive
    • - an outrageous act of bribery
  2. Wildly exaggerated or improbable
    • - the outrageous claims made by the previous administration
  3. Very bold, unusual, and startling
    • - her outrageous leotards and **** routines
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Appaling

ap·pall·ing

adjective

  1. Awful; terrible
    • - his conduct was appalling
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Annoying

an·noy·ing

adjective

  1. Causing irritation or annoyance
    • - annoying habits
    • - unsolicited calls are annoying
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Unacceptable

un·ac·cept·a·ble

adjective

  1. Not satisfactory or allowable
    • - unacceptable behavior
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Infringement

in·fringe·ment

noun

  1. The action of breaking the terms of a law, agreement, etc.; violation
    • - copyright infringement
    • - an infringement of the rules
  2. The action of limiting or undermining something
    • - the infringement of the right to privacy
    • - this bill is an infringement of our civil liberties
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Unreliable

un·re·li·a·ble

adjective

  1. Not able to be relied upon
    • - he's lazy and unreliable
    • - unreliable information
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Beneficial

ben·e·fi·cial

adjective

  1. Favorable or advantageous; resulting in good
    • - the beneficial effect on the economy
    • - discoveries beneficial to mankind
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Responsibility

re·spon·si·bil·i·ty

noun

  1. The state or fact of having a duty to deal with something or of having control over someone
    • - women bear children and take responsibility for child care
  2. The state or fact of being accountable or to blame for something
    • - the group has claimed responsibility for a string of murders
  3. The opportunity or ability to act independently and make decisions without authorization
    • - we would expect individuals lower down the organization to take on more responsibility
  4. A thing that one is required to do as part of a job, role, or legal obligation
    • - he will take over the responsibilities of overseas director
  5. A moral obligation to behave correctly toward or in respect of
    • - individuals have a responsibility to control personal behavior
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Government

gov·ern·ment

noun

  1. The governing body of a nation, state, or community
    • - an agency of the federal government
    • - government controls
  2. The system by which a nation, state, or community is governed
    • - a secular, pluralistic, democratic government
  3. The action or manner of controlling or regulating a nation, organization, or people
    • - rules for the government of the infirmary
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Environment

en·vi·ron·ment

noun

  1. The surroundings or conditions in which a person, animal, or plant lives or operates
  2. The setting or conditions in which a particular activity is carried on
    • - a good learning environment
  3. The overall structure within which a user, computer, or program operates
    • - a desktop development environment
  4. The natural world, as a whole or in a particular geographical area, esp. as affected by human activity
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Society

so·ci·e·ty

noun

  1. The aggregate of people living together in a more or less ordered community
    • - drugs, crime, and other dangers to society
  2. The community of people living in a particular country or region and having shared customs, laws, and organizations
    • - the high incidence of violence in American society
    • - modern industrial societies
  3. A specified section of such a community
    • - no one in polite society uttered the word
  4. The aggregate of people who are fashionable, wealthy, and influential, regarded as forming a distinct group in a community
    • - a society wedding
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Minister

min·is·ter

noun

  1. A member of the clergy, esp. in Protestant churches
  2. (in certain countries) A head of a government department
  • - Britain's defense minister.
  •  

verb

  1. Attend to the needs of (someone)
    • - her doctor was busy ministering to the injured
  2. Provide (something necessary or helpful)
    • - the story was able to minister true consolation
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Council

coun·cil

noun

  1. An advisory, deliberative, or legislative body of people formally constituted and meeting regularly
    • - an official human rights council
  2. A body of people elected to manage the affairs of a city, county, or other municipal district
  3. An ecclesiastical assembly
  4. An assembly or meeting for consultation or advice
    • - that evening, she held a family council
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Councillor

coun·ci·llor

noun

  1. A member of a council
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Advantage

ad·van·tage

noun

  1. A condition or circumstance that puts one in a favorable or superior position
    • - companies with a computerized database are at an advantage
    • - she had an advantage over her mother's generation
  2. The opportunity to gain something; benefit or profit
    • - you could learn something to your advantage
    • - he saw some advantage in the proposal
  3. A favorable or desirable circumstance or feature; a benefit
    • - the village's proximity to the town is an advantage
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Disadvantage

dis·ad·van·tage

noun

  1. An unfavorable circumstance or condition that reduces the chances of success or effectiveness
    • - a major disadvantage is the limited nature of the data
    • - the impact of poverty and disadvantage on children
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Proposal

pro·pos·al

noun

  1. A plan or suggestion, esp. a formal or written one, put forward for consideration or discussion by others
    • - a set of proposals for a major new high-speed rail link
  2. The action of putting forward such a plan or suggestion
    • - the proposal of flexible work hours
  3. An offer of marriage
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Belief

be·lief

noun

  1. An acceptance that a statement is true or that something exists
    • - his belief in the value of hard work
    • - a belief that solitude nourishes creativity
  2. Something one accepts as true or real; a firmly held opinion or conviction
    • - contrary to popular belief, Aramaic is a living language
    • - we're prepared to fight for our beliefs
  3. A religious conviction
    • - Christian beliefs
    • - I'm afraid to say belief has gone
    • - local beliefs and customs
  4. Trust, faith, or confidence in someone or something
    • - a belief in democratic politics
    • - I've still got belief in myself
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Believe

be·lieve

verb

  1. Accept (something) as true; feel sure of the truth of
    • - the superintendent believed Lancaster's story
    • - Christians believe that Jesus rose from the dead
  2. Accept the statement of (someone) as true
    • - he didn't believe her or didn't want to know
  3. Have faith, esp. religious faith
    • - there are those on the fringes of the Church who do not really believe
  4. Feel sure that (someone) is capable of a particular action
    • - I wouldn't have believed it of Lois—what an extraordinary woman!
  5. Hold (something) as an opinion; think or suppose
    • - I believe we've already met
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Opinion

o·pin·ion

noun

  1. A view or judgment formed about something, not necessarily based on fact or knowledge
    • - I'm writing to voice my opinion on an issue of great importance
    • - that, in my opinion, is dead right
  2. The beliefs or views of a large number or majority of people about a particular thing
    • - the changing climate of opinion
  3. An estimation of the quality or worth of someone or something
    • - I had a higher opinion of myself than I deserved
  4. A formal statement of advice by an expert on a professional matter
    • - seeking a second opinion from a specialist
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Subjective

sub·jec·tive

adjective

  1. Based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions
    • - his views are highly subjective
    • - there is always the danger of making a subjective judgment
  2. Dependent on the mind or on an individual's perception for its existence
  3. Of, relating to, or denoting a case of nouns and pronouns used for the subject of a sentence
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Challenging

chal·leng·ing

adjective

  1. Testing one's abilities; demanding
    • - challenging and rewarding employment
  2. Inviting competition; provocative
    • - there was a challenging glint in his eyes
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Divided

di·vide

verb

  1. Separate or be separated into parts
    • - consumer magazines can be divided into a number of different categories
    • - the cell clusters began to divide rapidly
  2. Separate (something) into portions and distribute a share to each of a number of people
    • - Jack divided up the rest of the cash
    • - the property was divided among his heirs
  •  
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Viewpoint

v·iew·p·oint

noun

  1. A view or judgment formed about something, not necessarily based on fact or knowledge
    • - I'm writing to voice my viewpoint on an issue of great importance
    • - try and look at it from my viewpoint.
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Prejudiced

prej·u·diced

adjective

  1. Having or showing a dislike or distrust that is derived from prejudice; bigoted
    • - people are prejudiced against us
    • - prejudiced views
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Initiative

in·i·ti·a·tive

noun

  1. The ability to assess and initiate things independently
    • - use your initiative, imagination, and common sense
  2. The power or opportunity to act or take charge before others do
    • - we have lost the initiative and allowed our opponents to dictate the subject
  3. An act or strategy intended to resolve a difficulty or improve a situation; a fresh approach to something
    • - a new initiative against car crime
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Argument

ar·gu·ment

noun

  1. An exchange of diverging or opposite views, typically a heated or angry one
    • - I've had an argument with my father
    • - heated arguments over public spending
    • - there was some argument about the decision
  2. A reason or set of reasons given with the aim of persuading others that an action or idea is right or wrong
    • - there is a strong argument for submitting a formal appeal
    • - he rejected the argument that keeping the facility would be costly
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Moral

mor·al

adjective

  1. Concerned with the principles of right and wrong behavior and the goodness or badness of human character
    • - the moral dimensions of medical intervention
    • - a moral judgment
  2. Concerned with or adhering to the code of interpersonal behavior that is considered right or acceptable in a particular society
    • - an individual's ambitions may get out of step with the general moral code
  3. Holding or manifesting high principles for proper conduct
    • - he is a caring, efficient, moral man
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Debate

de·bate

noun  

  1. A formal discussion on a particular topic in a public meeting or legislative assembly, in which opposing arguments are put forward
  2. An argument about a particular subject, esp. one in which many people are involved
    • - the national debate on abortion
    • - there has been much debate about prices
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