Differing approaches to heathcare

SPINE - The differing approaches to health care, simplified

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Bethany
  • Created on: 26-03-13 11:16

Socialised

  • An example of this is Cuba.
  • Health Care is totally paid for by the state.
  • Very efficient - Second highest life expectancy in the Caribbean (79 years for female)
  • There is an emphasis on training new doctors.
  • 21 medical schools in Cuba - free for students.
  • There are 30,000 family doctors in Cuba.
  • Infant mortality as low as in the UK (5 per 1000 live births.)
  • Ranked by WHO as just below the USA in the terms of the health care it offers.
  • This is remarkable as spending in Cuba is 10 times less.
1 of 6

Pluralistic

  • An example is the USA.
  • There are independent doctors, pharmacies, clinics and hospitals.
  • The consumer pays for his/her treatment.
  • Most have insurance.
  • In the USA, basic care is provided. Medicaid for poor, and Medicare for the elderly.
  • Over 55% of health care provided is private.
2 of 6

Insurance (Social Security)

  • An example is France.
  • The health care in France judged best in the world by WHO.
  • Freedom to choose your own doctor or check into a hospital; a 'hypercondriacs paradise.'
  • Patient pays upfront and is reimbursed to varying degrees.
  • An excess is paid.
  • Often topped up by private health care schemes.
  • Doctor: Patient ratio 3:1000 in France.
  • Health care expenditure is 10% GDP.
3 of 6

NHS (National Health Service)

  • In the UK.
  • Health care is funded by the taxpayer.
  • Some treatments cost extra for adults (optometry, dentistry, prescriptions)
  • 12.9% of health care is still private, often through workplace schemes such as BUPA.
  • Effective - a high life expectancy (81 years for women.)
4 of 6

Emergent

  • An example is India.
  • There is a mixture of traditional/herbal and western medicine.
  • Patient: Doctor ratio 500:1 in cities.
  • Cities are where most hospitals are located.
  • Patient: Doctor ration 7000: 1 in rural areas.
  • Little access to hospitals in rural areas. Mostly small or mobile clinics which treat minor ailments and give advice on basic hygiene.
  • Less that 2% of India's GDP is spent on health care.
  • The world bank is aiming to improve this.
5 of 6

SPINE - A summary

Socialised

Pluralistic

Insurance (Social Security)

NHS

Emergent

6 of 6

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Geography resources:

See all Geography resources »See all Pollution and health risks resources »