Diagnostic Features of the Five Kindoms

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Diagnostic Features of the five kingdoms

Prokaryote 

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Prokaryote

  • have no nucleus
  • have a loop of DNA that is not arranged in linear chromosomes
  • have naked DNA ( DNA that is not associated with histone proteins)
  • have no membrane bound organelles
  • have smaller ribosomes than in other groups
  • have cells smaller than eukaryotes 
  • maybe free-living or parasitic
  • gains nutrition from organic compounds such as carbon
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Diagnostic Features of the five kingdoms

Protocista

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Protoctista

  • Are eukaryotic 
  • are mostly single-celled (however many algae are multicellular)
  • show a wide variety of forms (the only feature that ALL protoctists have in common is that they can't be classified under any of the other 4 Kindoms)
  • show various plant-like and aniaal-lke features
  • are mostly free living
  • have autotrophic or heterotrophic nutrition (some photosynthesise, some ingest prey, some feed using extracellular enzymes and some are parasites
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Diagnostic Features of the five kingdoms

Fungi

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Fungi

  • are eukaryotic
  • can exist as single cells or they have a mycellium that consists of hypae
  • have walls made of chitin
  • have cytoplasm that is multinucleate
  • are mostly free-living and is saprophytic- cause decay of organic matter
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Diagnostic Features of the five kingdoms

Plantae

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Plantae

  • are eukaryotic 
  • are multicellular 
  • have cells surrounded by a cellulose cell wall
  • are autotrophic (absorb simple molecules and build them into larger organic molecules)
  • contain chlorophyll
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Diagnostic Features of the five kingdoms

Animalia

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Animalia

  • are eukaryotic
  • are multicellular
  • heterotrophic(digest large organic molecules to form smaller molecles for absorption)
  • are usually able to move around
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