Coin Street case study

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  • Created by: Spannah
  • Created on: 05-06-18 16:05

Overview

Coin Street is on the south bank of the river Thames in London, and we can use the case study as an example of a community-led project to create place meaning. Led by the local community, this project is a housing organisation and social enterprise. The main aim of the project is to make the area a better one in which to live, work and visit. 

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Why was the regeneration needed? and how did the l

In the 1970s, the area was characterised by derelict warehouses, a shrinking population and a weak local economy with few services. In 1977, the site was to be sold for office & hotel development, but residents campaigned for the plans to be changed and formed a community action group. The group protested and in 1984, the GLC (Greater London Council) changed the planning status of the site to residential, causing the value to decrease. The Coin Street Community Builders (CSCB) bought the land for £1million. 

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What did the CSCB do?

They organised the demolition of derelict buildings, making the river more accessible to local communities. Between 1984 and 1988, the South Bank riverside walkway, Gabriel's Wharf and Bernie Spain Gardens (a new park) were built. The Oxo tower was regenerated, to contain: shops, flats, a museum, an art gallery and a restaurant (multiple uses). 

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Living in the local area

There are currently over 230 homes in the area, but the CSCB plans to develop a new site, Doon Street, including 330 flats, a community swimming pool, dance studios and a commercial space to let. Current community facilities: the Colombo centre, a community sports centre, and the Coin Street Neighbourhood Centre which has a nursery and after school club, a youth club, and runs a full programme of classes & activities for all residents. Also run by the centre is a full programme of events & festivals for both locals and non-locals, throughout the year. 

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Importance and involvement of the community

The CSCB employs a team, to develop/manage/maintain the site & oversee its community & enterprise support programmes. Some charities also support education, arts & community services. Members of staff are required to live locally so they understand the needs & opportunities of the area. Residents are stakeholders in the project and are therefore closely involved. Community-led projects include: maintaining gardens (the 'Gorgeous Gardens Project') researching the heritage of the area and encouraging children to read. The Neighbourhood Centre also runs the 'Confidence to Work' and 'Money Champions' schemes, offering training in employability skills and managing money in order to support those at risk of falling into financial difficulty.  

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Importance and involvement of the community

The CSCB employs a team, to develop/manage/maintain the site & oversee its community & enterprise support programmes. Some charities also support education, arts & community services. Members of staff are required to live locally so they understand the needs & opportunities of the area. Residents are stakeholders in the project and are therefore closely involved. Community-led projects include: maintaining gardens (the 'Gorgeous Gardens Project') researching the heritage of the area and encouraging children to read. The Neighbourhood Centre also runs the 'Confidence to Work' and 'Money Champions' schemes, offering training in employability skills and managing money in order to support those at risk of falling into financial difficulty.  

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