China's Population Policy

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China's Population Control - Case Study

Serious famine in 1959 - left 20 million dead

After famine, there was a population boom - population increased by 55 million per year and nothing was done to control this increase

1974 - 'later, longer, fewer' - did not work well, population continued to increase

1979-1990 - ONE CHILD POLICY - strict limits on who could have children - family planning workers in every workplace - forced abortion and sterilisation became common, as did female infanticide - couples wanted sons so many baby girls were killed so couples could try again - single-boy families led to 'Little Emperor Syndrome' (boys becoming extremely spoilt) - policy worked well and increase began to slow

1990 onwards - one-child policy began to relax as it was difficult to enforce, but shows it must have been effective - still encouraged in remote areas such as Huaiji, a region of Guangdong, the capital

2006 - annual growth rate fallen to 0.6%, showing a dramatic decline in rate of increase

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China's Population Control - Case Study

Serious famine in 1959 - left 20 million dead

After famine, there was a population boom - population increased by 55 million per year and nothing was done to control this increase

1974 - 'later, longer, fewer' - did not work well, population continued to increase

1979-1990 - ONE CHILD POLICY - strict limits on who could have children - family planning workers in every workplace - forced abortion and sterilisation became common, as did female infanticide - couples wanted sons so many baby girls were killed so couples could try again - single-boy families led to 'Little Emperor Syndrome' (boys becoming extremely spoilt) - policy worked well and increase began to slow

1990 onwards - one-child policy began to relax as it was difficult to enforce, but shows it must have been effective - still encouraged in remote areas such as Huaiji, a region of Guangdong, the capital

2006 - annual growth rate fallen to 0.6%, showing a dramatic decline in rate of increase

2 of 2

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