A Christmas Carol Characters Summarised

Ebenezer Scrooge

  • Miserable
  • Tight-fisted
  • Ill-mannered
  • Self-deluded
  • Redeemed by the end

Scrooge is the main character of the Dickens novella. He is first presented as a miserly, unpleasant man. He rejects all offerings of Christmas cheer and celebration as 'Humbug!'.

On Christmas Eve, he is visited by his old business partner, Jacob Marley, who warns Scrooge that he will be visited by three spirits. Each spirit strikes fear into Scrooge until he softens.

Scrooge doesn't care about anything except for his money. He's cold-hearted and unfeeling. We learn that Scrooge's past has shaped him. Scrooge has to see himself as others see him. He is shown by Tiny Tim that poor people are people too. Scrooge's values later change.

 

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Bob Cratchit

  • Humble
  • Hardworking
  • Family man
  • Obedient
  • Generous
  • Sensitive
  • Fearful

Bob Cratchit is Scrooge's clerk, he works in unpleasant conditions without complaint. He obeys Scrooge's rules and is timid about asking to go home to his family on Christmas Eve.

When the Ghost of Christmas Present takes Scrooge to visit Bob Cratchits on Christmas Day, he sees Bob carrying his sick son, Tiny Tim, and later raising a toast to Scrooge for providing the feast.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows the Cratchits in the future where Tiny Tim has died and we see how sensitive Bob is. His love for his son is shown through his grief.

When Scrooge changes for the better, Bob is delighted. He welcomes Scrooges new-found generosity and friendship.

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Fred

  • Cheerful
  • Generous
  • Kind-hearted
  • Positive
  • Persistent
  • Enthusiastic
  • Joval
  • Caring

Fred is Scrooge's nephew, and his only living family. He is the son of Scrooge's sister, Fan. He is a complete contrast to Scrooge. Fred never seems to be particulary put of by his uncle's grumpiness, he feels sorry instead.

Fred is also a cheerful man. His personality is defined by his distinctive and pleasant laugh. His laugh illustrates his cheerfulness and optimism. He is even-tempereed and refuses to argue with Scrooge. He is determined to include Scrooge in Christmas celebrations as he believes in the importance of being kind at Christmas, especially to family.

Fred shows true Christmas spirit as he is someone who shows values relating to Christmas. Fred also shows generoisty when inviting Scrooge to his party.

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The Ghost of Christmas Past

  • Young and old
  • Commanding
  • Streaming with light
  • Ephmeral
  • Gentle
  • Quiet
  • Firm

The Ghost of Christmas Past arrives at the chimes of one. It is an ephemeral spirit, appearing to be both young and old at the same time with light streaming from the top of its head.

It takes Scrooge to the scenes of his past, showing him visions of his childhood, young adult and of happier times. The final scene presented is one Scrooge can not bear to witness, his lost love Belle, with her family.

Scrooge turns to the ghost and demands to be shown no more. He attempts to extinguish to ghost's light with its own cap, wrestling it to the ground. However the light that shines from the ghost can not be put out.

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The Ghost of Christmas Past

  • Young and old
  • Commanding
  • Streaming with light
  • Ephmeral
  • Gentle
  • Quiet
  • Firm

The Ghost of Christmas Past arrives at the chimes of one. It is an ephemeral spirit, appearing to be both young and old at the same time with light streaming from the top of its head.

It takes Scrooge to the scenes of his past, showing him visions of his childhood, young adult and of happier times. The final scene presented is one Scrooge can not bear to witness, his lost love Belle, with her family.

Scrooge turns to the ghost and demands to be shown no more. He attempts to extinguish to ghost's light with its own cap, wrestling it to the ground. However the light that shines from the ghost can not be put out.

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The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

  • Silent
  • Dark
  • Omnious
  • Frightening
  • Demanding

The final ghost is frightening and eerie. It does not say a word, but glides and points to visions to Scrooge.

The spirit shows a funeral scene, with businessmen wondering about the money left by the dead man. The ghost tehn takes Scrooge down dark alleyways to a scene of three people picking through belongings of the deceased person. Scrooge recognises his own death could be met this way.

The ghost then takes Scrooge to the Cratchit household where Scrooge is upset as he realises Tiny Tim has died.

Finally, the ghost shows Scrooge a tombstone engraved with the name: Ebeneezer Scrooge. Cluthcing at the spirit's robes, Scrooge pledges he can change his ways if he can avoid this solitary death. The ghost disappears leaving Scrooge clutching at his curtains.

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Tiny Tim

  • Kind
  • Disabled
  • Thoughtful
  • Patient

Tiny Tim is one of Bob Cratchit's sons. He walks with a crutch and has 'his limbs supported by an iron frame'. Despite his physical difficulties, he is positive and generous. He thinks of others and is well-loved by his family.

Scrooge is affected by the child and when he is shown the Cratchit family by the Ghost of Christmas Present, he worries whether Tiny Tim will live.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows a possible future where Scrooge's fears are realised and Tiny Tim has died.

When Scrooge changes his character at the end of the novella, we learn he becomes like a second father to Tiny Tim.

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Jacob Marley

  • "two kindred spirits"
  • Obsessed with money"
  • Don't care about others

Marley's main role in the novella is to warn Scrooge what will happen after he dies, unless e changes.

Marley's punishment is the consequence of a self-centred "misused" life. Dickens has already shown Scrooge behaving similarly - so Marley's fate illustrates what wull happen to Scrooge is he doesn't change.

Marley's appearance is disturbing. Scrooge feels "the chilling influence" of Marley's "death-cold eyes". When the ghost removes the bandage from its head, its "lower jaw dropped upon its breast".

Marley tries to help Scrooge because he regrets that he didn't change his ways whilst he was alive. Now he can only offer Scrooge a chance to escape the same fate.

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The Cratchit Family

The Cratchits are poor but loving. Bob Cratchit is Scrooge's employee. He's also a kind and devoted father. Mrs Cratchit is good-natured and busy. Tiny Tim is frail - but he doesn't complain. The Cratchit children are hard-working.

Mr and Mrs Cratchit have six children - Martha, Peter, Belinda, two "smaller Cratchits" and Tiny Tim. Except for Martha, they all live in the same four-roomed house. They're loving and cheering despite their poverty.

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Fan

Fan helps to break Scrooge's isolation.

She was Scrooge's sister, who was affectionate, loving and full of laughter.

She had a strong bond with Scrooge - she calls him "Dear, dear brother"

Fan had asked her father more than once to allow Scrooge to come home.

Fan is dead by the time the main events of the novella take place, making the reader pity Scrooge for having lost the sister he once loved.

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Fezziwig

Fezziwig is a businessman with a generous heart.

Mr Fezziwig was Scrooge's genial, cheerful employer wheb he was a young apprentice. Fezziwig is used to contrast Scrooge - but he's a model for a man Scrooge later becomes

Fezziwig makes his warehouse "snug and warm, and dry, and bright" for a Christmas party for family and workers. This contrasts with Scrooge's mean, dark office when he becomes an employer.

Fezziwig and his wife dance vigorously at the party. He's a jovial, energetic figure.

Fezziwig has the power to make people's lives good or bad, and he chooses to make them good. H edoesn't spend lots of money on the party, but what he does spend is used to bring joy to others, which creates a great deal of happiness. Scrooge realises this, and begins to the same in his own life.

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Belle

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Charity Collectors

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Joe and the thieves

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Wealthy London Businessmen

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