Virgil's 'The Aeneid' Book II Analysis and Translation GCSE - Lines 624-638

A collection of notes analysing in detail word order, word choice and sound in Virgil's 'The Aeneid' made by a GCSE student for others who are taking the subject.

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Preview of Virgil's 'The Aeneid' Book II Analysis and Translation GCSE - Lines 624-638

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Points to make on lines 624 ­ 638 of Virgil's `The Aeneid'
tum vero omne mihi visum considere in ignis
Ilium et ex imo verti Neptunia Troia: 625
ac veluti summis antiquam in montibus ornum
cum ferro accisam crebrisque bipennibus instant
eruere agricolae certatim, illa usque minatur
et tremefacta comam concusso vertice nutat,
vulneribus donec paulatim evicta supremum 630
congemuit traxitque iugis avulse ruinam.
descendo ac ducente deo flammam inter et hostis
expedior: dant tela locum flammaeque recedunt.
atque ubi iam patriae perventum ad limina sedis
antiquasque domos, genitor, quem tollere in altos 635
optabam primum montis primumque petebam,
abnegate excise vitam producer Troia
exsiliumque pati.
Then indeed it seemed to me that the whole of Ilium sank in flames and Neptune's Troy was
overturned from its foundation. Just as when on mountaintops farmers eagerly strain to
uproot an old rowan tree which has been hacked with iron and frequent axe blows. It
continually threatens (to fall) and nods with its trembling leaves and shaken crest until
gradually, entirely overwhelmed by its wounds, it groans its last loudly and comes crashing
down torn up from the ridge. I got down and, with a god guiding me, I was given a clear
path amidst the flames and enemy weapons yielded to me and the flames receded.
And now when I reached the door of my father's house, the ancient home, my father,
whom I longed to bear to the high mountains first and made for first, refused to prolong his
life and suffer exile since Troy had been destroyed.

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Word order:
Line 630:
`Vulneribus' (`by its wounds') begins the line to create emphasis and, as the verb is moved
from the end to the front, it gives the impression that the line itself has been wounded or
disfigured and thus the reader can relate to what is going on.
Line 631:
Enjambment on the previous line emphasises the word beginning this line: `congemuit'
(`torn up'). As this is a powerful word, it needs to be exaggerated.…read more

Page 3

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Neptune is spoken
of. It is ironic that Neptune's city, Troy, is said to sink, almost like a ship would sink in his
waters. ...Or it could just be a coincidence and `to sink' has no significance!
Line 629:
`Tremefacta comam' (`trembling leaves') may be a metaphor. Within this simile the rowan
tree `nods with its trembling leaves and shaken crest until gradually, entirely overwhelmed
by its wounds, it groans its last loudly and comes crashing down torn up from the ridge'.…read more

Comments

terry krigas

Very useful resource

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