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Parli
· Respo
ame
nsibili
nt
ty for
can
legisla
tion
now
began
dism 1720s+
to
iss
pass
gover
·Gave
from
legitimac
nme
· the
y Englis
to laws
from
monar
hnt the
Post-Glorious
monarch
ch
with
monarto Revolution
·Gave
Parlia
chs
a
consent
toment
advise
vote
·taxations
dofby no
·Role of
repres
Parlia
confi
supporti
entati
ment Late 17th Century
ng the
denc
ves
was
Monarch of
y, e
the
not
not to
control
aristoc
expect
their
racy
ed to
power
·
and of
initiat
the
e
Common Middle Ages+
towns
s legisla
requeste
and
tion
dcounti
`redress
ofes
·grievance
Existe
s'd to
developed?
assist
the
monar
How was the role of Parliament
ch
rather…read more

Slide 3

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What is the difference between
Parliamentary and Presidential
government?
Parliamentary Presidential
Parliament is the main The legislature and
source of political power executive are separately
All members of the elected
government must also be a The President is not part of
member of the Commons or the legislature
Lords The President/ executive is
The powers of the accountable directly to the
government and the people
legislature are fused There is a clear separation
The government must be of powers between the
accountable to Parliament executive and legislature by
a codified constitutional
arrangement…read more

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Parliamentary Sovereignty
· Parliament is the source of all
political power, but can delegate
How has Parliamentary
· Parliament may restore to itself sovereignty has been
any powers previously delegated eroded?
· Parliament may make any laws it · some legislative power
wishes, to be enforced by the courts has been moved to the EU
and other authorities
· increasing executive
· Existing laws may be amended or power
repealed at will
· increased use of
· Parliament cannot bind its referenda
successors i.e. laws cannot be · devolution
entrenched…read more

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Plenary Sessions
A plenary session is simply a session of full
attendance, of the Commons or Lords
This does not happen very often, but does
occasionally for PMQT or when a great issue
is debated, e.g. hunting ban, Iraq
All loyal party members are expected to
vote on government legislation but they do
not have to be present for debates…read more

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Standing Committees
Temporary committees formed to examine
a particular piece of legislation
Can be made up of between 15 ­ 50
members, depending on the complexity of
the legislation
All MPs and peers have to take turns of
being on committees
A relevant government minister also is on
each committee
Amendments are debated in committee
and inserted if the committee reach a
majority decision…read more

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