To His Coy Mistress

Here is a to his coy mistress analysis from the AQA english literature relationship cluster

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Stage 1:
Poem: To His Coy Mistress
Subject: Trying to persuade a girl to pursue a relationship with himself
Themes: Carpe diem (seize the day)
Messages: Seize the day, take life as it comes
Stage 2:
Poem: To His Coy Mistress
Emotions, Desire-
Moods, The final stanza, in which the speaker grows impatient to convince his mistress, is full of references to
Feelings: speed, urgency and passion. The simile 'while the youthful hue/Sits on thy skin like morning dew'
restates the speaker's desire, with a focus on his mistress' body. The 'morning dew' is also an effective
simile in that dew very quickly disappears as the day advances, like her youthful appearance.
Impatience-
Right from the second stanza the poet makes it clear that the poet doesn't want a long courtship with her
and he wants to seize the day.
Frustration-
As the narrator wants to have a physical relationship with his mistress: 'let us sport while we may' yet the
mistress still need persuasion. There is a sense of frustration follows this as the narrator wants the
mistress to think the way he does.
Urgency-
Due to time moving on and the poet feels that they need to enjoy being together now.
Reluctance-
From the increasing frustration the poet portrays, it appears that the mistress is unwilling to pursue the
physical side of a relationship.
Sarcasm-
With the use of a hyperbole to exaggerate how much time the poet would like to spend courting: 'an
hundred years should go to praise/ thine eyes' and he sarcastically mocks traditional ideas of courtship
and the poet sees the delay as a waste of time. With the use of sarcasm to frighten the mistress with the
thought of death: 'the grave's a fine and private place./ But none do I think, do there time embrace'
Stage 3:
Poem: To His Coy Mistress
What Hyperbole- 'an hundred years' just to look at her physical beauty and praising her if he had time but
techniques are the use of hyperbole portrays that he is exaggerating to hopefully woo this women
used
And what Charming imagery- the poet has used a lot of imagery to try and charm her of what
effect do they
Have on the Death and decay imagery- in the second stanza to show the lover the pointlessness of resisting.
reader: Once dead "then worms shall try/That long preserved virginity". This disgusting image is intended
Bethany Cunningham To His Coy Mistress

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Animalistic imagery- He suggests that 'like amorous birds of prey' they should 'at once our time
devour'. This imagery is quite animalistic, and hints at his barely-contained desires. They should not,
he thinks, be waiting for death. He speaks of 'instant fires', meaning their feelings of desire, urging
his mistress that they should 'sport us while we may'.
Pun- of her 'quaint honour', which could be seen as a reference to her naïve preservation of her
virginity even though death ('turn to dust') is inevitable.…read more

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This indicates that their love should grow and flourish if they had the time. However this quote
could also have a hidden undertone that fruit will flourish and grow but soon it will rot away and this
insinuates that their love won't last forever.
Extended metaphor-
The poem is a famous example of the classical idea of "carpe diem" (seize the day).…read more

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To His Coy Mistress' and 'my vegetable love should grow' this indicates that their
love should grow and flourish if they had the time. However this quote could also have a hidden undertone that fruit
will flourish and grow but soon it will rot away and this insinuates that their love won't last forever.…read more

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