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Slide 1

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THE REPEAL
CAMPAIGN
1840-1844…read more

Slide 2

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SUPPORT
· Support of the peasantry ­ they would decrease
Landlords' powers.
· Catholic Church.
· Campaign financed by `Repeal Rent' (national movement)
that held monster meetings (peaceful).
· Repeal Association ­ a vast pressure group that used
public agitation and propaganda.
· Supported by small group of extreme nationalists:
YOUNG IRELAND (Thomas Davis)
· Parish Priests were loyal too ­ many bishops had openly
supported the campaign.
Archbishop Mactlale was most powerful man in the Irish
Catholic Church.
· NB: O'CONNELL THEREFORE HAD TO AGREE WITH
THE CHURCH ON CONTENTIOUS ISSUES, SUCH AS
EDUCATION.…read more

Slide 3

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AIM
· Electoral Reform
· Reform of the Church of Ireland
· Tenant's rights
· Economic Development
· Reform in Ireland
· Repeal of the Act of Union…read more

Slide 4

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METHODS
· Monster meetings and propaganda
· Public agitation
· CLONTARF ­ AUTUMN 1843 ­ O'Connell
hints at mass unrest and military action. Peel
swiftly banned monster meeting and O'
Connell accepted the decision, effectively
killing the Repeal Campaign.
· O'Connell opted for more peaceful tactics:
speeches etc.…read more

Slide 5

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REASONS FOR FAILURE
· Catholic m/c saw material benefits from Union.
· Peel strong ­ strong united Conservative Party,
with a large majority in HOC (not dependent on
the Irish members to keep power, unlike with
Litchfield).
· Only 19MPs in O'Connellites ­ lost influence
following Litchfield.
· Irish electorate no longer included 40shilling
freeholders.
· Young Ireland had different tactics to O'Connell,
and also long-term aims.
· Army strengthened in Ireland ­ encouraged
stronger opposition from Peel.…read more

Slide 6

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O'CONNELL AND YOUNG IRELAND -
DIFFERENCES
· O'Connell:
Established a National Repeal Association in 1840 ­
organisation of `monster meetings' which led to
mass support: overall around 3-4 million people.
Press and public posters ­ propaganda.
Used the machinery of Parliament to obtain
political and religious equality.
· Young Ireland:
Extreme radical group that were pro-violence.
Considered armed rebellion.
Peaceful means were a `delusion'.
Arrests and Transportations.
Rebellions.
Ended with the `Battle of the widow McCormack's
cabbage patch'.…read more

Slide 7

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