The Lake District (National Park)

DETAILED CASESTUDY: The Lake District (UK National Park)

  1. Background Information
  2. Local contribution of tourism
  3. Environmental impacts
  4. Social impacts
  5. Conflcits of interests
  6. Management strategies
  7. Evaluation
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LAKE DISTRICT NATIONAL PARK
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
The Lake District is located in a rural area of
North West England, within the county of
Cumbria. The park is 34 miles across and its
total area is nearly 230,000 ha ­ it is one of the
largest in the UK. It was designated as a
National Park in 1951.
Its geographical features are a result of
glaciation over 15,000 years ago. The National
Park can be accessed from the M6, A591 and
A66.
Facilities include 10,000 bed spaces, sailing,
mountain hiking and canoeing. The facilities are
unevenly spread across the park and therefore
so are visitors.
CONTRIBUTION OF TOURISM
LOCALLY
42,000 jobs in Cumbria are dependant on tourism­ that is 1 sixth of the total
workforce.
More than half of the jobs in the Lake District alone are based on tourism.
Tourism is very important to the area. The multiplier effect has been boosted in the
Lake District.
Leisure and tourist expenditure is estimated at £262 million ­ 40% from long-stay
visitors, but only 12% from day-visitors.
Estimated direct income is £51 million and 50% of farms are said to receive some
income from leisure and tourism.
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Erosion of fells (hills) by tourists walking and hiking through the District.
Pollution from cars, includes both noise and air pollution.
The cars are also causing congestion in the park and the busy towns (e.g.
Ambleside).
Both the air and noise pollution is bad for the local residents.
Environmental damage only usually occurs in specific areas.
SOCIAL IMPACTS
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Prices in shops in the main tourist areas have also been pushed up and this is bad for
the locals.
Shopping provision has become very focused on tourism at the detriment of the
local resident needs (also a conflict of interest).
`Honeypot' sites suffer greatest from congestion, noise and traffic pollution,
lowering the quality of life.
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
Locals
Shopping provision has become very focused on tourism at the detriment of the
local resident needs.…read more

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