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When and why ?
WHEN : 15TH OCTOBER- NOVEMBER OF 1914.
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WAR YPRES WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE
GERMAN ARMY.
THE BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE WERE DETERMINED TO TAKE IT
BACK, THEY DID IN THE BLOODY BATTLE OF YPRES ON 22TH OCTOBER
1914 TILL NOVEMBER 1914.…read more

Slide 3

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What happened
ACTUALLY, THE BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE HAD ALREADY MADE A CHARGE
TO YPRES TO BACK UP THE SOLDIERS COMING. HOWEVER, THEY DID NOT
REALISE THE EXTENT INTO THE FORCE THAT WOULD MEET THEM.
THE BATTLE BEGAN WITH A NINE-DAY GERMAN OFFENSIVE THAT WAS ONLY
HALTED WITH THE ARRIVAL OF FRENCH REINFORCEMENTS AND THE
DELIBERATE FLOODING OF THE BELGIAN FRONT. BELGIAN TROOPS OPENED THE
SLUICE GATES OF THE DYKES HOLDING BACK THE SEA FROM THE LOW
COUNTRIES.
THE FLOOD ENCOMPASSED THE FINAL TEN MILES OF TRENCHES IN THE FAR
NORTH, AND WHICH LATER PROVED A HINDRANCE TO THE MOVEMENT OF
ALLIED TROOPS AND EQUIPMENT.…read more

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Then.....
During the attack British riflemen held their positions, suffering
heavy casualties, as did French forces guarding the north of the
town.
The second phase of the battle saw a counter-offensive launched
by General Foch on 20 October, ultimately without success. It
was ended on 28 October.
Next, von Falkenhayn renewed his offensive on 29 October,
attacking most heavily in the south and east - once again without
decisive success. Duke Albrecht's German Fourth Army had
taken the Messines Ridge and Wytschaete by 1 November.
It also took Gheluvelt and managed to break the British line
along the Menin Road on 31 October. Defeat was imminent, and
the German KaiserWilhelm II, was shortly to arrive to
personally witness the taking of the town. However the arrival
of French reinforcements saved the town, the British counter-
attacking and recapturing Gheluvelt.…read more

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Lastly...
The German offensive continued for the following ten days, the fate of
Ypres still in the balance. A further injection of French
reinforcements arrived on 4 November. Even so, evacuation of the
town seemed likely on 9 November as the German forces pressed home
their attack, taking St Eloi on 10 November and pouring everything into
an attempt to re-capture Gheluvelt on 11-12 November, without
success.
A final major German assault was launched on 15 November; still Ypres
was held by the British and French. By this time the Belgian autumn
had set in with the arrival of heavy rain followed by snow. Von
Falkenhayn called off the attack.
It was becoming evident that the nature of trench warfare favoured
the defender rather than the attacker. In short, the technology of
defensive warfare was better advanced that that of offensive
warfare, the latter proving hugely costly in terms of manpower.
The BEF had held Ypres, as they continued to do until the end of the
war despite repeated German assault; the Allies also held a salient
extending 6 miles into German lines.…read more

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Who were the main people?
French Commander-in-Chief Joseph Joffre had
already lead an offensive on the Germans on the
Aisne river.
The BEF.
Sir John French
Eric von Falkenhayn, the German Chief of Staff,
sent his Fourth and Sixth armies into Ypres.
General Foch
Duke Albrecht's…read more

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