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Capabilities of Software

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Object Linking & Embedding (OLE)
OLE allows information to be shared between different
programs
­ For example, a spreadsheet created in Excel can be
included in a Word document either by embedding it in
the document, or by creating a link from the document.
An embedded object has no connection…

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Object Linking & Embedding (OLE)
Linked object
­ original information remains in the source file
­ destination file displays a representation of the linked
information but stores only the location of the original
data
­ linked information is updated automatically if you change
the original data in the source file…

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Portability of Data
Portability is the ability to run the same program on
different types of computer. It can also refer to the ability
to transfer a file from one computer to another.
For all sorts of reasons, it's important to be able to
transfer data between applications and between…

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Examples of Portability
You're writing a report in Word and want to be able
to insert an Excel spreadsheet in the report
You're using a desktop publishing system and you
want to be able to import some graphics from a
drawing package
You're doing a research assignment and want to…

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Problems with portability
A document created using one word processing package (e.g.
Word) commonly cannot be read by a another (e.g. Word
Perfect) running on the same computer
Formatting codes vary in different packages.
­ For this reason, most word processing packages allow documents
to be stored in `Text only'…

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Upgradability
Software manufacturers commonly bring out upgrades about every two
years. This causes some or all of the following problems:
­ Documents or applications produced by the upgraded software are
not `downwardly compatible' (or `backwards compatible').
· In other words, a document written in Version 6 can usually be read…

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Criteria for selecting a software
package
Compatibility with existing hardware. Will the software run on existing
equipment?
Compatibility with existing software. Can files from other packages be
imported/exported?
Quality of documentation
Ease of learning. How good is the on-line help? Are tutorials available?
Ease of use. Easy to use? Shortcuts…

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Evaluating software
Before selecting a particular package you
could:
­ Read reviews of it in a computer magazine.
Magazines commonly compare similar software
packages on dozens of different criteria;
­ Consult other users who have experience of the
type of software you are thinking of purchasing;
­ Perform benchmark tests…

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Software Reliability
Batch systems are relatively easy to test.
­ More controlled environment, where data is entered as batch,
processed and then output.
­ Expected results easily compared with actual results
­ Problems can be fixed and tests run again.
More complex on-line systems with GUI interfaces are much
more…

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