Richard III

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RICHARD III
WHY AND HOW DID RICHARD III MAKE HIMSELF KING?
Richard, Duke of Gloucester, was empowered by his marriage to Anne Neville, heir too
much of Warwick's estate.
Edward IV's immediate successor was his son (Edward V) and facing a desperate
struggle against the ambitions of the Woodville family, he knew he had to remove
Edward V (Elizabeth Woodville's son) from power.
He had the support of William, Lord Hastings and Henry Stafford, Duke of
Buckingham.
Whilst Richard was being protectorate to Edward V's minority, the Duke of Buckingham
was challenging the legitimacy of Edward V by saying his father was already
contracted to marry when he married Elizabeth Woodville.
In addition to this however; Richards supporters wished for rewards only a king
could possibly grant.
June 26 1483: The duke of Gloucester was crowned Richard III.
THE PRINCES IN THE TOWER ­ The mysterious disappearance of Edward V and his
younger brother.
BUCKINGHAM'S REBELLION:
October & November 1483: Richard III faced rebellion in the South from
members of Edward IV's entourage, including the duke of Buckingham.
After helping Richard with his usurpation he enacted a turn around, possibly
inspired by the Woodville faction, to save the princes.
As rumours of the prince's murders spread, the rebels began to champion
the claim of Henry Tudor. (weak claim however)
Richard raised a large army and the revolt was suppressed without a
fight following the arrest of its perpetrators.
The estates of Buckingham and the other `traitors' were seized by the king
and given to his supporters even before they could be legalised by the Acts
of Attainder.
`What great numbers of estates were amassed
in the king's treasury in consequence!' ­ Two
years after Richards death
Now conflict = NORTH VS SOUTH due to
Richard III.
Buckingham was executed without trial whilst
Henry Tudor returned back into exile followed by
many of the Southern Gentry.
THE REBELLION, DESPITE NO FIGHT, WAS VERY
COSTLY.

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RICHARD III
RICHARD'S ATTEMPTS TO RETAIN POWER:
`Richard cultivated a pious, God-fearing and just monarch' ­ Andrew Pickering
Legislation was passed through parliament outlawing benevolences.
Death of his son = 1484, Death of his wife =1485
Made plans to marry Edwards's daughter, Elizabeth claims of incest, alienated the
enemies of the Woodville's (Elizabeth Woodville's daughter) and gained Richard even
more unpopularity.
Rumours spread of him poising his wife because of an `incestuous passion.' he
had to make a public statement of denial.…read more

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