PSYB2 revision notes on Social facilitation, Memory and Individual differences

Thought I would share my revision notes with everyone else as it does save alot of time not having to write them out yourself and I wish someone had done this before for me. 

Notes include studies and evaluations. 

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  • Created by: Emily
  • Created on: 18-01-13 23:58

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Psychology Revision Sheet PSYB2 ­ SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Social Facilitation
Social facilitation is concerned with how and why activity is increased when others are present.
E.G athletes run faster if an audience is watching, and even cockroaches learn to navigate a maze faster if watched by
other roaches.
Coaction effects refer…

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The tasks that the participants perform in studies of social facilitation are often artificial and may lack ecological
validity
Audiences in studies of social facilitation are usually quiet, and therefore may not reflect the nature of audiences or
co-actors in the real world
The evaluation apprehension explanation is not supported…

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The credibility of the set-up: Perhaps participants were aware that the learner received no electric shock; i.e. the
set-up was not credible. However this is unlikely because in a study where participants had to give real electric shocks
to puppies, obedience was 75% (Sheridan and King)
Demand characteristics: Participants in…

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Models of memory
It is useful to think of memory as consisting of three stages or processes:
Encoding ­ the initial registration of information into memory.
Storage ­ memories are held for a period of time
Retrieval ­ this is the ability to access the stored memories when needed
Multi-store…

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Central executive: controls and monitors the other components (slave systems). Has limited storage capacity but can
process incoming auditory and visual information, enabling CE to allocate tasks to slave components. It also has the
ability to gather and co-ordinate info from LTM.
Visuo spatial sketchpad: stores visual and spatial info…

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Decay theory of forgetting
When we learn something, a group of nerve cells in the brain become active leaving a neural representation of what we have
learnt. (A memory trace). Over time with rehearsal and repetition the trace becomes stronger and more permanent. This
process is called consolidation. According to…

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needed to make the memory trace permanent, leading to retrograde amnesia. It cannot be due to failure of taking in
information as it was available for recall at the start.
EVALUATION
Neuroscientists have recently found evidence for the spontaneous reactivation of learning in the brain of mice. If this
process…

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and Social phobia for specific situations ­ panic will arise if the individual is faced with such a social situation, so these
are avoided wherever possible.
Agoraphobia ­ this is the most serious phobic disorder. It is associated with a fear of leaving home, being in a crowd,
visiting public…

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3. Under estimating the ability to cope- I'd never be able to cope in a wheel chair
An agoraphobic person is hypersensitive to spatial layouts in the environment and if they are too far away from a caretaker.
If access to home or caretaker is blocked then an agoraphobic has…

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the sufferer fears they will act on them. Common themes are ideas (germs everywhere), doubts, impulses (to shout
out obscenities) or images.
Compulsions ­ repetitive behaviours or mental acts that reduce anxiety or prevent something bad from happening.
Includes overt behaviours, like hand washing or checking, and mental acts, like…

Comments

Zee Hicks

reaaally good! it has everything in for the exam. only criticism is that it doesn't include pictures of the memory models, but it does include details on all of them. definetely using! thank you :)

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